Obtenez votre premier livre audio gratuitement

Collusion

How Central Bankers Rigged the World
Auteur(s): Nomi Prins
Narrateur(s): Ellen Archer
Durée: 14 h et 30 min
Catégories: Affaires, Commerce
4 out of 5 stars (8 évaluations)

CDN$ 14,95 par mois; les 30 premiers jours sont gratuits. Annulable en tout temps.

Description

In this searing exposé, former Wall Street insider Nomi Prins shows how the 2007-2008 financial crisis turbo-boosted the influence of central bankers and triggered a massive shift in the world order.

Central banks and international institutions like the IMF have overstepped their traditional mandates by directing the flow of epic sums of fabricated money without any checks or balances. Meanwhile, the open door between private and central banking has ensured endless opportunities for market manipulation and asset bubbles - with government support. 

Through on-the-ground reporting, Prins reveals how five regions and their central banks reshaped economics and geopolitics. She discloses how Mexico navigated its relationship with the US while striving for independence and how Brazil led the BRICS countries to challenge the US dollar's hegemony. She explains how China's retaliation against the Fed's supremacy is aiding its ongoing ascent as a global superpower and how Japan is negotiating the power shift from the West to the East. And she illustrates how the European response to the financial crisis fueled instability that manifests itself in everything from rising populism to the shocking Brexit vote. 

Packed with tantalizing details about the elite players orchestrating the world economy - from Janet Yellen and Mario Draghi to Ben Bernanke and Christine Lagarde - Collusion takes the listener inside the most discreet conversations at exclusive retreats like Jackson Hole and Davos. A work of meticulous reporting and bracing analysis, Collusion will change the way we understand the new world of international finance.

©2018 Nomi Prins (P)2018 Hachette Audio

Ce que les critiques en disent

"Central banks, led by the Federal Reserve, are the opioids for private banks addicted to being reckless with other people's money. Prins, drawing from her previous work in Wall Street firms and her present field research around the world, says, 'We are headed for another epic fall.' Taxpayers, workers and consumers who will suffer from another bailout, all better read this clear, concise, compelling book." (Ralph Nader)

"A somber, important warning that's likely to cause readers to wonder about the safety of their assets, if not fear for the near-term future." (Kirkus Reviews)

"[An] unflinching, troubling exposé... well worth a close read by anyone looking to understand the roots of the last crash and prepare for the next." (Publishers Weekly)

D'autres livres audio du même...

Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

Moyenne des évaluations de clients

Au global

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    5
  • 4 étoiles
    1
  • 3 étoiles
    1
  • 2 étoiles
    1
  • 1 étoile
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    3
  • 4 étoiles
    2
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    0
  • 1 étoile
    0

Histoire

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    3
  • 4 étoiles
    1
  • 3 étoiles
    0
  • 2 étoiles
    1
  • 1 étoile
    0

Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

Trier :
Trier par:
  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars

A bit of a misfire

I would guess a good 98% of this book is just regurgitating news which has been available to all over the past 15-20 years without much comment on the part of the author. This makes the read extremely dry if not a tad wonky. In fact, it is hard to stop from glazing over with the neverending numbers and her love of abbreviations and acronyms. Then, in her conclusion (only a few pages) she comes alive and makes some great points. If only she had commented, drawn parallels, given opinions in the rest of the book, this could have been an excellent effort.

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Read this!

Narration and writing were very good. Layout of material was very good as well. Only had the issue of repetition through the chapters.

Trier :
Trier par:
  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • jeff
  • 2018-06-05

Long on detail short on meaning

If you are buying this book to understand the ethics of central banking move on. It's an important string of details that build an argument for, as the title says "Collusion" among central bankers. However Prins avoids an examination of the moral hazard of self interested private bankers determining our monetary policy and much of the world economy.

11 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Vitruvian Man
  • 2019-06-28

Thorough research, well presented but could have been shorter

I purchased this book after hearing it recommended several times as a definitive piece of work on the actual (and perceived) role of central banks. Nomi Prins did not disappoint. The book is the result of decades of research on this one, often misunderstood, topic of central banks and their role. It describes in detail a journey across the Americas, Asia and Europe during the time leading to and after the global financial crisis (GFC). But with each geographic area she first delves into their respective history to set the context for the decisions that were being made during the GFC and why.

There’s an old proverb that says “When the elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers”. In this book the elephants are the heads of Central Bank and government leaders in each country. The average citizen (on market street not Wall Street) is trampled on as central bank decisions are made in the interest of a select few. But the really insightful (and somewhat scary) part is how the various countries and economic blocks colluded in thinking and in their actions, which weren’t necessarily what they had said in the first place.

This book is for anyone interested in understanding why we are where we are economically and financially. Even for the uninitiated in economics like me; I’m in IT security & risk, there is a lot to learn from the well presented findings. Ellen Archer does a great job keeping the story alive throughout. My only dislike is that on several occasions the book went over the exact same wording from earlier sections while describing a different geographical setting. This made the book longer than I feel it could have been.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • William D Harris
  • 2018-08-09

A clear insightful narrative of monetary collusion

Greatly enjoyed book and insightful narrative of monetary collusion as it delved into the role big banks played in its aftermath.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Anthony J. O'krongly
  • 2019-06-28

Way too in the weeds

The premise of this book that the author is inside the system is not reflected in the book itself which is reams of information from public sources about minute details country by country by country. It’s not worth listening too unless you just have 16 hours to waste.

It spends 16 hours to basically say that in 2008 the central bankers took over the world and they aren’t going to give it back.

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Ryan Blair
  • 2018-11-06

Fantastic!!!

Fantastic overview of global financial evolution! This is an incredibly detailed account of the men behind the curtain in high finance on a globe scale! Loved it!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Philo
  • 2018-05-09

Fair history survey, lazy characterizations

Why do I read a book -- "hire" an author? To get unique value. Here, I had trailed off on the central bank story some in recent years, so a survey of the recent history would have some value. This work, on its facts, was mostly content I could get from a google search of key headline articles over the same time span. No, we are not made privy to these whispered confidential insider conversations, as the publisher's teaser hints. Mostly we get the basic facts alongside public PR press releases of the top central bankers and finance ministers. This recounting was worthwhile but not standout; it was useful to see a compendium of the rhetoric of these officials and nations, back and forth. That is the better aspect and value of this book: it is pretty good as a basic history recital.

How about the analysis, then? Instantly, peeves jumped out here. One was the repetition of certain trademark phrases, murky and ill-defined. Collusion was one. How is it distinguished from cooperation? Well, if one accepts the (not thoroughly historically grounded) evil bankers subtext, then I guess we could use that term carelessly thereafter. But that narrative, often some sort of faintly leftish populist whining to my ears, isn't neatly pinned to the history and facts. We just need to swallow the author's POV. A better book, IMO, would elevate the discussion by explicating the nuances, dilemmas, trade-offs and alternatives faced by these actors in those times. Instead, we have simplistic breezy passages skipping by these matters, and too much of a tone of resentful sniping (expressed in simplistic, overused catch-phrases). I guess I should be satisfied with these cues for what I should uncritically conclude alongside this author. Of course elitist bankers who go to Davos are wrecking our lives and crushing the noble aspirations of emerging economies, right? (I do agree with her point that the Fed fumbled subprime regulation pre-crisis. OK, there is a whole history there, written up elsewhere, not explicated here, but then? What new insights are to be found? Once the edifice was in collapse, after centuries of a buildup of this semi-private weird banking system, AT THAT JUNCTURE, what tools were at hand, what alternative risks? Eternal resentment is the cheap shot for a thinker and author, I believe.) How, for example, would things be different if the (supposedly) noble Joe Six-Packs of the world (who had just themselves heedlessly plunged off a cliff into subprime home loans they signed) had been simply handed wads of money? That is impliedly (I think? I am left to conjecture in this murk) suggested as a better thing, but not explored. What might have happened without these bankers' machinations? We simply get recrimination here, mostly. This same casual tossing about of words and assumptions surrounds the oft-used (and useless, and carelessly constructed, and pejorative) term money-conjuring. Hello: we got a central bank to get elasticity in currency aggregates when needed. But none of that (troublingly nuanced and complex stuff, though not beyond the reach of this book's audience) is here. Instead, we can take a sniping tone to suggest these Davos elites are some sort of malevolent witches, cackling and conjuring money as if around a cartoon cauldron. So too, this author in any situation of ambiguity invariably defaults to criticizing US financial elites, versus any of the other (I will say, at least equally greedy, scheming, self-interested) players and I think she tends to laud others in other nations who are playing the same games, usually less aptly (IMO).

Finally, the excessive casualness appears in imputing intentions and motives to people and whole nations unsupported by the data points provided. Several times we are told what Ben Bernanke's aims were, alongside his quotes that are more intelligent and nuanced than the author tried to nudge us to believe. And, I recall a phrase, not unusual in its style in this book, of the sort, "the United States believed ...." That is absurd on its face. The USA is not a monolithic entity that believes some simple linear thing. Some person(s) within the USA took a position, yes. It would be more accurate to call the USA completely schizophrenic than to impute such a narrow belief. I.e., this has low information content.
I would, if editing this, have, I believe, helped push this author harder point by point to produce a far more justifiably penetrating and influential work. The promise is here, the framework is here, the execution falls short. I think All the President's Bankers by her had almost identical issues.

13 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Mark Fry
  • 2020-05-04

A financial timeline laced with opinion

In the author's recounting of historical events surrounding the renegotiation of NAFTA, BREXIT, the QE's under Obama, and the election of Trump are all historically accurate in timeline but presented through the opinionated views often expressed by the corporate news media. Furthermore there are deeper circumstance involved in these topics that supersede and are more important than who the elected representatives were.
To be fair I couldn't finish this book because I've already read others that have more in depth analysis and in a less opinionated way, maybe she can add more to the different topics later in the book but the rehashing of corporate propaganda as fact is tiresome and I'm out. I would recommend the author James Rickards for this topic.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-03-14

A timeline of central banking collusion

This is a brilliant timeline of global collusion by central banks to inflate asset prices which primarily the wealthy own exclusively.
With so many names and dates it's a bit hard to follow as an audiobook but I'm sure the hard copy is a page Turner.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2020-02-19

Tons of examples of collusion I hope they can find

Tons of examples of collusion I hope they can find a solution. I always figured the market recovered surprisingly fast and smoothly.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Johan
  • 2019-11-07

Central banks is the biggest scam

Very insightful book and it's actually scary to think that the collusion is still going on today