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Dominion

How the Christian Revolution Remade the World
Auteur(s): Tom Holland
Narrateur(s): Tom Holland, Mark Meadows
Durée: 22 h et 18 min
Catégories: Histoire, Monde
5 out of 5 stars (8 évaluations)

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Description

A historian of antiquity shows how the Christian Revolution forged the Western imagination

Crucifixion, the Romans believed, was the worst fate imaginable. It was this that rendered it so suitable a punishment for slaves. How astonishing it was, then, that people should have come to believe that one particular victim of crucifixion - an obscure provincial by the name of Jesus - had been a god. Dominion explores the implications of this shocking conviction as they have reverberated throughout history.

Today, the West remains utterly saturated by Christian assumptions. Our morals and ethics are not universal. Instead, they are the fruits of a very distinctive civilization. Concepts such as secularism, liberalism, science, and homosexuality are deeply rooted in a Christian seedbed. From Babylon to the Beatles, Saint Michael to #MeToo, Dominion tells the story of how Christianity transformed the world.

©2019 Tom Holland (P)2019 Basic Books

Ce que les critiques en disent

"a sweeping narrative...[Holland] is an exceptionally good storyteller with a marvelous eye for detail...excellent fun." (The Economist)

"What in other hands could have been a dry pedantic account of Christianity's birth and evolution becomes in Holland's an all-absorbing story...It takes a master storyteller to translate the development of a philosophical notion into a captivating story, and Holland proves to be one... Holland offers a remarkably nuanced and balanced account of two millennia of Christian history - intellectual, cultural, artistic, social and political. The book's scope is breathtaking." (The Literary Review)

"Christianity may not be on the march, but its principles continue to dominate in much of the world; this thoughtful, astute account describes how and why... Holland delivers penetrating, often jolting discussions on great controversies of Western civilization in which war, politics, and culture have formed a background to changes in values... An insightful argument that Christian ethics, even when ignored, are the norm worldwide." (Kirkus Reviews, starred review)

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Weird narration

I started reading the paperback version (which I was thoroughly enjoying) and decided to supplement with audio on my daily commute to get through the book a little faster. Very odd choice of narrator, whose overly dramatic voice makes taking in and retaining the content very difficult. It makes a fantastic book and piece of scholarship feel like a cheap documentary that a substitute teacher throws on in an unruly highschool class. Mr. Holland should have read the entire book, not just the intro.

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  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • John Murphy
  • 2019-12-19

A Little Confusing

This book was a little confusing, or at least my expectations were confused. I thought it was going to be a study of how Christian culture and thought took over the world (which it certainly did), instead it read to me like a travelogue of Christian history. I found myself repeatedly asking the question, “what is the author’s purpose in all this?” Rightly or wrongly it was befuddling to me.

That is not to say that the book isn’t interesting, because it is.

I think my favorite parts of the book were two-fold, first the prologue and epilogue because Mr. Holland writes personally in those sections and I found them the most interesting parts for me, especially in the epilogue concerning the influence of his great-aunt who was a committed Christian.

The other part of the book that I enjoyed was when Mr. Holland writes of current events. He rightly points out the origin in a Christian milieu of virtually all of the forces that are either outright opposed to the Christian faith, or certainly at odds with it. As one example the “woke” movement in which, not only must you ask forgiveness for your sins, but also do penance and atone for them. Where did this pattern come from? The Christian faith of course. Mr. Holland gives plenty of examples, and, like it or not, he is correct in his analysis

8 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2019-11-04

Author only reads preface

Author only reads preface. Other guy reads the rest. Beware. It’s good. You just won’t get that sweet accent for twenty-two hours!

12 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • horoscopy
  • 2019-11-19

lots of nice writing, but kind of light on history

just like the other Tom Holland books I have read , I felt it was nice, sweet and fluffy, but kind of lacking in substance.

btw , I do think (along with many others) that "Rubicon" was his masterpiece. this is kind of the closest he has come to that I think, but still a bit too fluffy in content.

7 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • TavianCainBass
  • 2020-01-09

Christendom as societal foundation

As the subtitle states, the aim of this book is to show how Christianity is the foundation upon which modern secular societies have been built and upon which the morality of those societies is based. In this, I believe the book succeeds admirably though not without a few hiccups.

Starting several centuries before the birth of Christ, Tom Holland describes what morality - such as it was - actually meant in pre-Christian cultures. With this starting point, the author takes us through twenty-one chapters, leading up to the present day, each one further along in time, showing how Christianity itself evolved as well as the Christians' understanding of what it meant to be Christian. Through this, the author shows that modern society's moral principles are so fully ingrained in Western civilization that we take them as a given (the concept of human rights and equality being primary among these) without recognizing how alien these concepts are - or were before Christianity. Even today's secular humanists rely upon them, many if not most of whom are not aware of the wellspring of their now-cherished beliefs.

I thought it was an excellent book and I learned a lot about history and the evolution of moral thought in this book. One complaint would be that there isn't, at the end, any resolution to the question of, If society no longer recognizes that it owes its cherished moral beliefs to Christianity, what will happen to those beliefs when/if Christianity recedes from daily life. To some extent this question is dealt with, perhaps a bit more completely, by Douglas Murray near the end of his book, "The Strange Death of Europe." Holland leaves this as more of an open question, only briefly asking the question itself near the end of the book.

But other than that quibble, I found this be an enlightening book that any student of history would enjoy. The narration is superb - both Tom Holland's introduction and conclusion and Mark Meadows' reading of the majority of the book.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Anna Miller
  • 2020-01-28

I’m overwhelmed with emotion.

The final pages left me overwhelmed with emotion; gratitude for what I’ve inherited, grief for what’s been lost, and a profound sense of awe at the enduring power of the Christian myth, of which we are all a part.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2020-01-08

Great overview of the religious, philosophical, and political development of the West

This is a very engaging and easily accessible overview of the development of Western thought, and particularly the impact of a Persian, Greek, and Christian religion and philosophy, on our current world. Outstanding.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Philo
  • 2019-12-03

Prepare to be transfixed, transported

... that is, across the universes of ideas, personalities and history, delivered with such nimbleness and artistry as I've never seen. It just doesn't get any better than this. Prepare to be (thinking of the bloody crucifixion imagery) transfixed. Of what stuff are our interpretations and feelings built? Dig into the archaeology of it all here. Most every sentence shimmers with color, atmosphere and meaning. There is no physical trip that surpasses this. Here is gore and cruelty, right alongside infinite human grace. This lifts me right up out of every complacency and gives a new light to what I thought I knew. Maybe Tom Holland's style (much more artistry and license and sweep than typical academic history) isn't for everybody, but for me, it is beyond perfect. Every nerd (and my "scientist" friends are the worst) who thinks Christianity is nothing but superstition ought to be strapped to a chair and made to listen to what is such an undeniable part of our human experience (and the doubters' own assumptions, expectations, behaviors and interpretations of things). But to be balanced, there are flat spells here that might justify a critic's point: Christianity's history does require a bit of wading through disputes on doctrine trying to the patience of a post-Medieval listener. I think Holland sustained a reader-friendly fascination, a blend of action and ideas, more consistently in "Shadow of the Sword." But I proclaim my admiration of this not as a Christian but as a somewhat perceptive and open-minded human who has tried to clear away a few cobwebs of rigidity, fear and arrogance. I DO like some sort of poetry with my life and death! This is lost in today's crowd scrambles for (and worship of) the purely instrumental, the mad dash for the ubiquitous pre-manicured (bleached) consumer "experience" and "stuff." And don't worry, Nietzsche and Darwin absolutely weigh in here, in all the grace and dignity that could be afforded them. But it takes courage to be reintroduced to one's own world with such a switch in frameworks. In any event, the matter will never be introduced with such graceful and crackling English and imagery as it is here. So much that is buried is resurrected in all vibrant dimensions. It is like living many lives, visiting many of (our won earthly historical) worlds.

Being humane, in my opinion, can and will spontaneously occur as a matter of lowering transaction costs and risks in resolving collective action problems, absent an overlay of specifically the sort Christianity shows. Also, it is possible for a very inhumane system to adopt the coloration of Christianity (or its ilk) as a camouflage, both in signalling to the self and others (see, e.g., the book Gomorrah by Saviano, here at audible). However, Christianity is a prime example of a vehicle for these purposes that has the advantage of having actually (somewhat) functioned across large populations. It does seem to be embedded in all sorts of everyday behaviors. I am not posing a view of the ultimate risks or merits of this, because it has its own problems: risks pool within its framework often masked from the players. This book just gives us a lot of context, and with as much sprightliness as one might ask.

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  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Daniel Wilcox
  • 2020-02-01

I nterestimg Hypothesis, Intriguing Stories

I learned about sections of history that I only had a vague knowledge about. However, Holland's claim that humanism and secularism is really Christian-based seems a stretch.

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • thomas keller
  • 2020-01-15

A matter of style

I know from previous books that Holland has a hard time writing straight forward. Entertaining though he is, after a while the kind of sentences of the kind as this one, become annoying. But when you superimpose an intonation that stresses every sentence in the hope of lending drama to the already dramatic the text becomes irritating. Former titles have much better narrations. Take the book on the Ceasars. The tumultuous events of the first century and its mad emperors do not need theatrical narration. The text can stand by itself, and so could this one. Sometimes the greatest effect is achieved by letting events speak for themselves. As to the contents, the body of New Testament scholarship is without limits and I am not sure Holland steps onto grounds as a mere guest here to produce "Tom Holland's Meditation on Christianity"

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
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  • Herbert Abrams
  • 2019-12-30

Long sophmore book report..

The word 'how' should be removed from the title. It it a recitation of events. Not much more.

1 personne a trouvé cela utile