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How Soon Is Now

From Personal Initiation to Global Transformation
Auteur(s): Daniel Pinchbeck
Narrateur(s): Nathan Osgood
Durée: 11 h et 45 min
3.5 out of 5 stars (13 évaluations)

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Description

The world needs to change.

We have unleashed an ecological mega-crisis which is threatening the future of life on Earth. The actions we take over the next decade are critical. They will determine the destiny of our descendants and the fate of our world. 

Is it too late?

How Soon Is Now presents a compelling manifesto for personal and planetary change. It proposes a revolutionary new narrative for a unified social movement. Through global cooperation, we can face this collective threat ecologically, socially, politically and spiritually. We can launch a new operating system for human society based on regenerative principles. 

The choice is ours.

Accepting this crisis as our initiation, we can choose to evolve to the next level of consciousness as a species. We can do more than survive: we can thrive.

©2017 Daniel Pinchbeck (P)2018 Audible, Ltd

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Au global

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  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars

Skip it, it’s all talk & no action

If a reader is (somehow) new to the ideas that the capitalist system is broken, an ultra-rich minority makes the rules, and humankind needs to collectively change its behaviour to avoid worldwide ecological collapse, then he/she might get something from this book, but really the author doesn’t offer any truly new solutions that aren’t available elsewhere, and in fact he references a number of books throughout his book that offer ideas/solutions that are as good as or better than his own. In fact, much of the time I felt he was summarizing the book and ideas of other like-minded people he has read over the years.

The author tells the reader that change must happen in order to avert global disasters (social, ecological, financial, etc.), but I was left with the impression that his solutions were largely armchair exercises in his case, and I’m tired of being preached at by those who don’t practice their own message. He was not writing from a successfully operating off-grid tiny house powered by solar and wind technologies, collecting rainwater and recycling his own waste products. By his own admission, he doesn’t grow food (although we’re told this is something we should all engage in), and we likewise should also reduce or eliminate the amount of meat we eat, but the author is a self-proclaimed lazy vegetarian (read that as opportunistic omnivore).

Note to author: Instead of suggesting to your audience all of the possible solutions to the world’s myriad problems, get off your butt and try some of them and then write about your successes and failures! We don’t need to hear about good vibes at Burning Man, tell us what YOU are doing at home, in an urban setting, to tackle some of the problems you’ve laid out!

One standout tidbit from this book that I haven’t seen elsewhere is the author’s serious suggestion that we all need to take psychedelics to access the untapped potential of our brains, so we can unleash our superpowers, such as telekinesis. Yep. For real. Seriously, I bought this book discounted as a Daily Deal, and I still overpaid. This book is at least ten years too late, we don’t need any more books detailing the world’s problems and suggesting possible solutions, we need to hear from people who have adopted a different (and hopefully better) paradigm and are living (or trying to) outside the box that the West has built.

Read Bill McKibben and Joel Salatin and myriad others instead of this book. Take a permaculture course, or just watch YouTube videos and try growing food; make global buckets; make lots of notes on what works and what doesn’t and write about that; buy the smallest house you can function in, not the biggest you can afford (same with your vehicle, if you must own a vehicle)... Engage, engage, engage!!

The narrator was fine, I was just not impressed with the book itself.

3 personnes sur 3 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Reads like a drug fueled rant at burningman

i was really hoping for an intelligent discussion about global warming, but instead he wrote this...

the author needs to get off his soap box and stop preaching. rich people are bad...drugs are good. everyone needs to become a vegetarian and eat locally and grow theor own crops...what crap. the vast majority of the information in this book is based on his own opinion and not backed by anything, this is proven by shallow he dives into each point and how quickly he changes the subject.

i got this book on sale for 5 bucks and its not even worth that.

but if youre the type that likes to rant about everyrhing wrong in the world and you seem to know the solution to everything this book will be your bible.

narrator did an excellent job though.

1 personnes sur 2 ont trouvé cette évaluation pertinente

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    5 out of 5 stars
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  • mark barden
  • 2018-10-17

A great reframing of the ecological collapse

Daniel Pinchbeck's notion that the ordeal that is the environmental crisis is humanity's collective initiation journey to an entirely new way of being is a game changer — this is an opportunity for rebirth and redemption — and an idea I've not seen/heard anywhere else. For me it stacks up. Sure it's a stretch, a massive stretch. But all other analyses of what's happening and why seem to come up short in the end because they fail to address the deep underlying causes beyond the facts of what we're doing. We're sick but we don't know why. And like the addict that needs to hit bottom before the revelation, we've got some tough times ahead. To counter the unavoidable pessimism, there's plenty of good news about the changes already underway to keep you going. There's reason to be optimistic and the future looks at least "interesting" if little like the world we now live in — if we can get there. Well-researched and well-written, I went back and forth between audio and book partly to escape the phony narration. Highly recommended.