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So You Want to Talk About Race

Auteur(s): Ijeoma Oluo
Narrateur(s): Bahni Turpin
Durée: 7 h et 41 min
4.5 out of 5 stars (123 évaluations)

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Description

A current, constructive, and actionable exploration of today's racial landscape, offering straightforward clarity that listeners of all races need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide

In So You Want to Talk About Race, editor-at-large of the Establishment Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions listeners don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystallize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, and Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word." A Harper's Bazaar pick of One of 10 Books to Read in 2018.

©2018 Ijeoma Oluo (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Ce que les critiques en disent

"Narrator Bahni Turpin's impassioned voice clearly conveys the gravity of this book on race and racism.... Key points are repeated to help listeners absorb ideas and definitions, and Turpin engagingly reads real-life examples Oluo uses to illustrate complex concepts such as intersectionality and white privilege." (AudioFile)  

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Ce que les membres d'Audible en pensent

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Au global

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Performance

  • 5 out of 5 stars
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  • 2 étoiles
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Histoire

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    90
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    19
  • 3 étoiles
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  • 2 étoiles
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Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Important Read!

This book is very informative and everything is said possibly and direct with due urgency.

it's a must read!

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • JR
  • 2018-05-23

A must listen

This book gives every reader a perspective they can connect to and learn from: a story, facts and data, tips and calls to action.

I loved it and learned from it and hope there is a second volume.

Reader was great!

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Very familiar experiences

Very familiar experiences growing up, yes, right here in Canada... I’ve put the book on display in my office. Maybe, just maybe, someone will ask to borrow it... The book was recommended by a (white) coworker as the book for the month. Interesting... quite harsh reality, I’m not sure I want to be part of that conversation...

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

if you want to do better-Listen

A good introduction and definitions of the many issues that need to be addressed involving race and other disadvantaged groups.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

wow!

how to all (blacks, creoles, Aboriginal peoples, whites, men and women) free ourselves from this past of slavery and genocide... thx Lady Oluo

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars

American author.

Much of this book is based on American statistics and issues. There is something here for everyone though.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Deeply insightful, I could not stop listening

I think we all know innately that something is wrong, but hearing it laid so bare and with such succinct power makes this an incredible listen. I'm so sick of hearing the same dismissals and same bad faith arguments brought up again and again that seeing them laid waste in this book so thoroughly was gratifying. This is a deep dive into an experience that is alien to me and I feel like a better person for having listened

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Informative and eye opening.

This book is a valuable teaching tool and should be read by all. I will listen to it again and again.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

A deeply important, must-read book.

I feel compelled to review and recommend this book because you need to do what I did: Get past the concern that this might not speak to what you need, and just give it a try. It'll be worth it.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

A must-read for everyone

You don’t need to be an activist to read this book. Maybe you are just an ally. Maybe you’re just a human who cares about all other humans. Whatever your situation, you will find that Ijeoma Oluo has matter-of-factly laid out all of the possible responses and arguments that people give to explain away racism or even just racist words or actions. We live in a racist society, of that there can be no doubt even in 2019. It’s a systemic issue, and this book was super enlightening for me to understand at least a little bit what I could never understand due to the color of my own skin. So if you don’t think we still live in a racist society, I recommend you read or listen to this book from beginning to end and open your mind to see it from another perspective. Everyone will benefit once you do, no matter who you are, because understanding each other in this crazy world is the most important thing of all.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • alibamba
  • 2019-01-29

A Reminder to Read Books that Make You Uncomfortable

Yes, conversations about race are awkward to hard and even hurtful and I’m not thrilled to be categorized as a white supremacist simply because I am white but even with all that discomfort, confusion, eyebrow raises, and slack jawed moments I experienced while listening I have to say my world feels bigger after reading this. My perspective is changed. I didn’t understand or even recognize my own racism or white privilege. I have not had to confront racism and I have not seen the part in it that I have played or know what action I could take to change. I am asking questions of myself and assumptions I’ve made about a range of other issues because if I didn’t see this, what else am I not seeing? I feel very blessed to have come across Oluo’s book and will continue to follow her work. I also feel compelled to share that the narration is top notch.

22 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • AmazonCustomer
  • 2018-02-05

Excellent book, excellently narrated.

Ijeoma Oluo has a gift for delivering hard medicine with humor and sensitivity. If you are a white person who wants to do better, this is a perfect primer on how (and when) to have conversations about race without doing more harm than good.

And Bahni Turpin is an impeccable narrator. She reads with a clarity and conviction that makes the content feel completely fresh, like a conversation, rather than a reading. A perfect fit with Ijeoma Oluo's writing style, too.

16 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Maggie
  • 2018-04-13

I'm really glad I took a chance on this book

If you could sum up So You Want to Talk About Race in three words, what would they be?

This book was insightful, challenging, and thoughtful.

Any additional comments?

I had never heard of the author before but I am so glad that I read this book because I do want to talk about race. It's a conversation that needs to keep going. In some places it's a conversation that hasn't even started.

9 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • shiawase
  • 2018-01-22

Must Read

Everything I hoped it would be and more, easy to understand chock full of numbered points of advice on various topics, personal anecdotes that connect to the larger picture and the inspiration to have these conversations and also take action.

If you’ve read and loved and learned from Ijeoma Oluo’s words online or in social media, you’ll recognize her same understanding of the complexity of these conversations (especially those that white people should be having with one another) and also her passion for social justice.

If you’re not familiar with her incredibly important work, and you’re willing to listen openly about racism from someone with much lived experience woven beautifully into a larger picture where we can all have an impact - positive, if we choose - I’d highly recommend this book.

This book covers many of the basics as a reminder so some but also encourages deeper reflection within ourselves. There are parts that feel necessarily squirmy, but it’s clear that she remains focused entirely on helping us all have better conversations about race and take better actions to change a system that isn’t fair.

If you’re not sure that’s the case about our system that still oppresses people but are open to listen, this book is a great place to do that, quietly away from some internet fight and with time to pause and consider.

Please read this.

16 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • chris
  • 2019-09-01

great truths wish it had more facts

If you’re a white person, and you’re convinced you know what people of color experience in their daily lives as racism and harassment in the US, this might be the book for you, provided you’re open to experiences that are outside your wheelhouse.
This is not the “kind and gentle” discussion on racism. It can be at times abrasive, depending on your experiences and perspective, but nonetheless an important truth packed with some facts.
Things I liked: personal examples and there are so so many which I found both shocking and like “wtf white people?!”, the data, there’s a “here’s what you can do”, boundaries and no one should be on call 24/7 to talk to anyone about anything and especially about a subject that triggers them and/or they have to put armor on for, etc.
Things I didn’t like: I wish there was more data (education, incarceration, health care, sexual assault, passed over in jobs, debt, etc.) especially in the beginning of the book, some pacing issues for me, etc.
I didn’t entirely understand “tone policing”.
I’ve heard about the rude misguided standard-asking-speakers-to-speak-and-expecting-them-to-donate-their-time-and-travel-at-their-own-expense from some speakers/authors on Twitter. I’m sure it’s more women than men and thus more women of color too, who are almost expected to do speaking gigs for free. Again, it’s another, “Wtf.”
Per including more data, for example, I’m working on a book about sexual assault and in my research I came across this data:

“African Americans are only 13% of the American population but a majority of innocent defendants wrongfully convicted of crimes and later exonerated. They constitute 47% of the 1,900 exonerations listed in the National Registry of Exonerations (as of October 2016), and the great majority of more than 1,800 additional innocent defendants who were framed and convicted of crimes in 15 large-scale police scandals and later cleared in “group exonerations."
Judging from known erroneous convictions, a prisoner serving time for sexual assault is three-and-a-half times as likely to be innocent if he is black than if he is white.”
In half of all sexual assault exonerations with eyewitness misidentifications, black men were convicted of raping white women,28 a racial combination that appears in less than 11% of sexual assaults in the United States.29 According to surveys of crime victims, about 70% of white sexual assault victims were attacked by white men and only about 13% by black men.30 But 57% of white-victim sexual assault exonerees are black (101/177), and 37% are white—which suggests that black defendants convicted of raping white women are about eight times more likely to be innocent than white men convicted of raping women of their own race.There are many possible explanations for this disturbing pattern, but the simplest is probably the most powerful: the perils of cross-racial identification. One of the oldest and most consistent findings of systematic studies of eyewitness identification is that white Americans are much more likely to mistake
one black person for another than to mistakenly identify members of their own race.3"
http://www.law.umich.edu/special/exoneration/Documents/Race_and_Wrongful_Convictions.pdf

Per data, specifically on health, I believe I read a highlight of an article on Twitter that black women have higher death rates in childbirth and heart attacks (I think it was heart attacks) because something like they're symptoms/complaints are more likely to be dismissed by the medical community. Here's what a simple google search found:

"Following decades of decline, maternal deaths began to rise in the United States around 1990—a significant departure from the world’s other affluent countries. By 2013, rates had more than doubled. The CDC now estimates that 700 to 900 new and expectant mothers die in the U.S. each year, and an additional 500,000 women experience life-threatening postpartum complications. More than half of these deaths and near deaths are from preventable causes, and a disproportionate number of the women suffering are black.
Put simply, for black women far more than for white women, giving birth can amount to a death sentence. African American women are three to four times more likely to die during or after delivery than are white women."
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/magazine/magazine_article/america-is-failing-its-black-mothers/

"A typical visit to the doctor for a black woman can be anything but. Stories earlier this month about Serena Williams’ horrifying medical ordeal and the high post-pregnancy mortality rates of black women show their medical concerns are often dismissed, ignored, or even chastised. Navigating the terrain of the medical world is hard enough—and even harder when the color of your skin can mean the difference between life and death, or receiving the right tests to diagnose what ails you in between. "
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qvedxd/doctors-dont-always-believe-you-when-youre-a-black-woman

There was a book long ago, can’t recall the name, where the author said you shouldn’t waste your time (not sure if that’s how he phrased it) arguing with people who already have decided. He said, you want to spend your time and energy on the group of undecided, because he said (again paraphrasing), “no one ever changed their mind because of an argument or from being attacked for their beliefs.”

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars
  • V. Taras
  • 2018-10-06

An Important Must-Read, but Worse than Expected

I have mixed feelings about the book.
On the one hand, I believe it is a must-read for anyone in the U.S., and a highly recommended read for anyone outside the U.S.
At the very least, it will give you a good perspective into the racial tensions in the U.S. and a good understanding of how it is seen by the activists of the African American community. Many eye-opening examples and explanations.
On the other hand, the book is not particularly engaging. Justifiably, it is filled with rants and complaints. However, I felt the case could have been made more strongly with more statistics and references to more studies. The book felt like a rally speech, and less like a piece of scholarly work.
Still, highly recommend. It was a good use of my time.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Chava Mirel
  • 2018-01-30

Read it twice in a row

And about to start the third. If you are concerned with systematic oppression of people of color, you must read this book. It is uncomfortable to discover that we are all perpetuating the white supremacist hierarchy, but brilliant social commentator Ijeoma Oluo provides concrete steps we can all take to dismantle it, with a message of accountability and hope.

10 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • UURev
  • 2019-12-19

Must read for white folks

I have done a lot of work on my privilege and racial bias (and I still have a LONG way to go) and books like this are so helpful, great reminders and calls to action, I will be rereading it again soon and asking all of my church staff to read it as well!

1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2018-08-16

Brilliantly argued

Well-written and informative with useful guidelines to keep in your pocket for having conversations about race. I learnt a huge amount.

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Luke Kelleher
  • 2018-05-23

Required reading

What an incredible work! I've never read anything that so clearly articulates what racism is and how it affects people's everyday life. Every chapter, every paragraph, every word of this book is absolutely necessary. Stop what you're doing right now and buy this book. Read it. Then buy copies for everyone in your family and have them read it. Especially your racist uncle. (Trust me, he really need it.)

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile