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So You Want to Talk About Race

Auteur(s): Ijeoma Oluo
Narrateur(s): Bahni Turpin
Durée: 7 h et 41 min
4,8 out of 5 stars (315 évaluations)

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Description

A current, constructive, and actionable exploration of today's racial landscape, offering straightforward clarity that listeners of all races need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide 

In So You Want to Talk About Race, editor-at-large of The Establishment Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions listeners don't dare ask and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans. 

Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned and crystallize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay, Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word". A Harper's Bazaar pick of One of 10 Books to Read in 2018. 

©2018 Ijeoma Oluo (P)2018 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

Ce que les critiques en disent

"Narrator Bahni Turpin's impassioned voice clearly conveys the gravity of this book on race and racism.... Key points are repeated to help listeners absorb ideas and definitions, and Turpin engagingly reads real-life examples Oluo uses to illustrate complex concepts such as intersectionality and white privilege." (AudioFile)  

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Ce que les auditeurs disent de So You Want to Talk About Race

Moyenne des évaluations de clients
Au global
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Histoire
  • 5 out of 5 stars
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Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Important Read!

This book is very informative and everything is said possibly and direct with due urgency. it's a must read!

4 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • JR
  • 2018-05-23

A must listen

This book gives every reader a perspective they can connect to and learn from: a story, facts and data, tips and calls to action. I loved it and learned from it and hope there is a second volume. Reader was great!

3 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars

Interesting listen

Now I understand where all these words and ideas circulating have come from. So much good information. I really appreciated her personal stories. It makes a lot of sense why she is so angry and has adopted this framework for seeing the world. The critical theory she invokes to create this universe of self perpetuating white supremacy and oppression, for me simplifies people to an unconscionable degree. So many essentialist notions of skin pigment as original sin or evidence of victimhood. The psychological state created by believing everything in this book seems very unhealthy. She states at the beginning of the book as one of her key points is that "if you believe it is racism then it is" This goes against every principle of modern psychotherapy. Thoughts should be interrogated and weighed against evidence to judge their validity and utility. It struck me as an almost religious text with very little room for interpretation. Her views are all encompassing and uses a kind of circular reasoning which always leads back to the infallible pronouncement of the white supremacist ether that spawned the west. Glad I listened to it but what a terrible way to perceive your fellow human beings. Skin colour rules the day. Sad. She does give a little wink to her audience near the end where she says maybe she is wrong and if so we will figure it out when the time comes but for now to move the bar we need to take this stance. This is what activists do to get things done Ive been told. Still a terrible resentful bitter way to see the world.

2 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

A must read!

Great book, couldn't put it down. Learned alot about myself and how I can be a better person and ally.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

A important read

This is a wonderfully written book focusing on issues that are front and centre today. Every person should be required to read/listen to this work. This gives advice on how to start doing and talking about anti racism work.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • NJ
  • 2020-08-12

A Must Read!

This book should be required reading/listening for every white individual. It’s informative, engaging and enlightening. Bahni Turpin’s narration was stellar!

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars

A must read for those of us who are White and wish to become an ally

A very provocative read. Be prepared to feel uncomfortable. The truth is not pretty. But if we wish to bring about meaningful change then we need to recognize the reality of white supremacy and systemic racism - from which white people have benefited for centuries. I thank the author for her courage in writing this very important book!

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Required Antiracist Reading

This book is wonderful. It will move you not only emotionally but more importantly to take action. Thank you Ijeoma.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Engaging and enlightening

This book made me realize how systemic racism is. it also had concrete examples that made the concepts clear. I now have a much better understanding of the issues people of colour face and how I can begin to help address them. The narrator was clear and spoke with emotion.

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent

Tout à fait extraordinaire ! Merci. This is a great self-development and professional development book for those in the service industry.

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  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • MoneySpenderPro
  • 2019-01-22

Logical Fallacy: (n)...

Difficult to follow when viewed in the light of heuristics and neurology. Reduces innate behavior and normal cultural adaptation to conscious wrong behavior. Identity politics defeat the collective goal of a neutral society. As the author states, she is mixed race as are many people, yet she clearly chooses to identify as belonging to one racial group instead of the other. Her stance that lighter skin equates to increasingly unfair social credit fails to account for the millions of light complexion people left behind in society. There is no doubt that racism exists in America, but choosing a tribe and attacking the other is not the way to accomplish it. Humans are all Africans. We belong to different families, not different races.

53 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • AmazonCustomer
  • 2018-02-05

Excellent book, excellently narrated.

Ijeoma Oluo has a gift for delivering hard medicine with humor and sensitivity. If you are a white person who wants to do better, this is a perfect primer on how (and when) to have conversations about race without doing more harm than good.

And Bahni Turpin is an impeccable narrator. She reads with a clarity and conviction that makes the content feel completely fresh, like a conversation, rather than a reading. A perfect fit with Ijeoma Oluo's writing style, too.

35 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • UURev
  • 2019-12-19

Must read for white folks

I have done a lot of work on my privilege and racial bias (and I still have a LONG way to go) and books like this are so helpful, great reminders and calls to action, I will be rereading it again soon and asking all of my church staff to read it as well!

14 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Susanna Heath
  • 2020-04-29

Critical and a must read

At the risk of being just another white woman talking about how a book on race makes her feel...this book made me feel a lot. I consider myself a feminist and over the last year have learned much about intersectionality, and how I cannot fight for the rights of women without also including other marginalized people. But I do not have many people of color in my life. My social media feed is made up of mostly white liberal women. I didn’t feel comfortable talking about race, suspecting I was probably a little racist myself. I found this book on a list of must-read books on race. The chapter headings immediately hooked me. These were the questions I wanted to ask, and didn’t know how. Ijeoma presents the information calmly and with some humor but also with the underlying steel and passion that evokes a real emotional response to many tragic topics. She answers questions and brings up additional information I had never previously considered. I believe everyone should read this book and begin to take action in their communities.

12 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2018-11-24

best audio book yet

First the topic and writing is amazing. Whether or not you're interested in issues of race, the author describes in precise detail the workings of our white supremacy system in all our lives. Yes, there are a lot of specific pointers about having conversations around race whether you're white or of color. For me it was far more important in its description of workings of the system that I can't see from my position. most of all, she handles these loaded issues with a great deal of compassion and humor along with straight talk. The narrator is the best I've heard, as well. I've already given 2 copies if the book away...

11 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • L. Keepers
  • 2020-08-15

Microagression To Whites

I read this book with my black friends at a book club hoping to be part of the solution and learn about my own hidden biases. For every good point there were several "microagression" against ME. Even my POC friends were embarrassed that I had to be insulted in front of them. And they were insulted that she assumes all black people have the same political views. They didnt. We have agreed to put into practice those few good suggestions in the book and forget the rest of it. My black friends apologized to ME instead of the other way aroumd.

9 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Maggie
  • 2018-04-13

I'm really glad I took a chance on this book

If you could sum up So You Want to Talk About Race in three words, what would they be?

This book was insightful, challenging, and thoughtful.

Any additional comments?

I had never heard of the author before but I am so glad that I read this book because I do want to talk about race. It's a conversation that needs to keep going. In some places it's a conversation that hasn't even started.

17 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • shiawase
  • 2018-01-22

Must Read

Everything I hoped it would be and more, easy to understand chock full of numbered points of advice on various topics, personal anecdotes that connect to the larger picture and the inspiration to have these conversations and also take action. If you’ve read and loved and learned from Ijeoma Oluo’s words online or in social media, you’ll recognize her same understanding of the complexity of these conversations (especially those that white people should be having with one another) and also her passion for social justice. If you’re not familiar with her incredibly important work, and you’re willing to listen openly about racism from someone with much lived experience woven beautifully into a larger picture where we can all have an impact - positive, if we choose - I’d highly recommend this book. This book covers many of the basics as a reminder so some but also encourages deeper reflection within ourselves. There are parts that feel necessarily squirmy, but it’s clear that she remains focused entirely on helping us all have better conversations about race and take better actions to change a system that isn’t fair. If you’re not sure that’s the case about our system that still oppresses people but are open to listen, this book is a great place to do that, quietly away from some internet fight and with time to pause and consider. Please read this.

30 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-09-01

a white blue caller man trying to understand BLM

a tough read, certainly felt my blood pressure rising at times,. but I'm not sure what the point of this book was, a little math I'm a union electrician, I think it's fair to say I'm very average., I make 34.99 a hour so my black brothers and sisters make 3.50 to maybe 7 bucks a hour? and The inherint violence and blatent sexuality in rap is exclusively due to second rate White rappers just there to make a buck? and it's wrong to dress up for Halloween because of cultural appropriation but if you dress up like a European your a racist? because kids don't dress up like something they love and want to know more about but let's make it an adult holiday so we can argue about that too. and angry students? you have never listened to white male music have you? (I don't much either it's to angry) between the words privilege and systematic racism you have very neatly decided excatly what all white people are and the only reason white people are successful is because in every situation there's a winner and a looser and since we've made black people the looser we get to be the winner. it's strange, if I want to talk about race I'm supposed to get to know the other culture and as a white man your lack of any understanding on any level of the white paradyme is profound, to use your words, your cultural appropriation is profound and on a last note that you would suppose our epically under funded, under staffed and over sized classroom sized schools don't talk about slavery and the civil rights movement and black suffrage I'm not sure we're you've been, not at school

5 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    2 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Greg Lindsay
  • 2019-03-24

Some insights here but it went overboard

The first few chapters were pretty good and I found myself re-evaluating some of my beliefs about what sort of things should be considered racist. However, right around the chapter where it discusses cultural appropriation and abuse that people of color have suffered at the hands of the music industry, the author takes an angry arc that continues for the rest of the book. At one point she justifies any kind of behavior by people of color when talking about race as long as it doesn't physically harm someone. If you are white, then you can be accused of "tone-policing" if you ask the discussion to be civil, and tone-policing is of course racist. I understand the point here that something needs to be done and serious problems don't get solved by treating them as trivial discussions to be forgotten by the next day. However, yelling at someone is going to hurt more than help, even if it gets you noticed. I disagreed with the author here quite strongly, and even the fact that she held this opinion made me doubt some of the other things she said. Still, I did my best to put a mental bookmark here and not judge the rest of the book. The story about the first time she heard the n-word was something that broke my heart. Children can be so mean. However, the stories about police stopping her for minor infractions were not quite as compelling. I think the author blames some things on race that can happen to anyone. For example, I've experienced much worse myself including speeding tickets when I wasn't speeding at all, and searches for drugs when I didn't have any. I've also been beaten by kids in high school for nothing more than being a new kid in school. However, I do recognize that I've never felt that my life was in danger from the police and I think that's something people of color can feel, and have the right to feel. All in all, the author taught me some things, so I'm glad I read the book. I just wish that she had approached some of the subjects with more of an open mind rather than with a virtual chip on her shoulder, regardless of whether or not she deserves to have that chip.

12 les gens ont trouvé cela utile