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Description

The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged and how these reactions maintain racial inequality.

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to 'bad people'" (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. 

In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

Download readers' guides at beacon.org/whitefragility.

©2018 Robin DiAngelo (P)2018 Random House Audio

Ce que les critiques en disent

“[T]houghtful, instructive, and comprehensive... This slim book is impressive in its scope and complexity; DiAngelo provides a powerful lens for examining, and practical tools for grappling with, racism today.” (Publishers Weekly)

“As a woman of color, I find hope in this book because of its potential to disrupt the patterns and relationships that have emerged out of long-standing colonial principles and beliefs. White Fragility is an essential tool toward authentic dialogue and action. May it be so!” (Shakti Butler, president of World Trust and director of Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible)

“A rare and incisive examination of the system of white body supremacy that binds us all as Americans... With authenticity and clarity, she provides the antidote to white fragility and a road map for developing white racial stamina and humility. White Fragility loosens the bonds of white supremacy and binds us back together as human beings.” (Resmaa Menakem, author of My Grandmother’s Hands and Rock the Boat)

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Ce que les auditeurs disent de White Fragility

Moyenne des évaluations de clients
Au global
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    877
  • 4 étoiles
    137
  • 3 étoiles
    60
  • 2 étoiles
    22
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    68
Performance
  • 4 out of 5 stars
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    527
  • 4 étoiles
    194
  • 3 étoiles
    122
  • 2 étoiles
    41
  • 1 étoile
    67
Histoire
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 étoiles
    729
  • 4 étoiles
    105
  • 3 étoiles
    32
  • 2 étoiles
    21
  • 1 étoile
    50

Évaluations – Cliquez sur les onglets pour changer la source des évaluations.

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  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars
  • j
  • 2020-06-26

White guilt

Does not provide any evidence other than anecdotes. Provides no helpful solutions or ways to deconstruct and improve “systematic racism”. I tried so hard to challenge my opinions and find meaning in this book, but alas, I shall keep trying with other books.

44 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    3 out of 5 stars

Mixed Feelings

It's fair to say I haven't put much work into reviewing my perspective on my own behaviour and how I may be unintentionally contributing to bias, prejudice or racism, with an emphasis on 'unintentionally'. Perhaps i'm doing something without my awareness? Perhaps I need to do more to actively work against racism in my predominantly white area? Given the societal unrest at this time (spring / summer 2020), I felt it necessary to improve on this gap, as I hope to become a better person over time, reduce suffering in the world and do my part to help others where I can.

I initially started with 'Me and White Supremacy' before coming to this work. I think the large benefit to a book like 'White Fragility', and others of a similar vein, is the increased awareness of how my well intentioned actions may unintentionally perpetuate hardships for people of colour or may be perceived by POC as mis-guided, off-base, tone-deaf, culturally ignorant / insensitive etc. It's more on the fore-front of my mind, and encourages thinking before acting or speaking.

The issues I have with this book are the argument that someone reacting defensively to being labelled a racist is proof of fragility, which in turn supports the argument that they're in fact quite comfortable with supporting racism and white supremacy because calling it out to the open disrupts their comfortable lifestyle which is upsetting. If you were to give any well-intentioned and well-meaning progressive individual a horrific label such as being a racist (as classically defined), pedophile, etc, of course you're going to get a strong adverse response, moreso for people who absolutely want to be better people than that, and moreso when it's delivered as a blanket statement against all people with a given skin colour (ironic, given a book of this nature). If you use that defensiveness as evidence of participation which supports the label, it's going to absolutely turn people away, they'll turn their ears off, etc. There needs to be more time spent on the idea that the definitions of racism and white supremacy have changed, or to use alternate terms for the expanded breadth of these concepts, which will help prevent the knee-jerk reaction given most peoples definition of racism and white supremacy.

I think the idea of dismissing outward displays of compassion as a self-centered need to be the focus of attention (referred to as white womens tears in the book), assumes the worst in people. Is it not possible that someone can feel moved to tears when hearing another person speak of their experience in life, which they've endured as a result of their skin colour? Is it really fair to say that people crying is just their need to get more attention?

My take-aways from the book are that I want to continue to be open-minded on the topic, hear directly from POC as to what can be done better, and to actively do my part to stand-up when something racially-motivated is happening. I think the book lacks concrete actions that can be taken, and leaves me feeling that because I'm white, i'm guilty. If I speak to a POC, it's tokenism and I'm overriding the discussion. If I try to help the movement, its either cultural appropriation or it's being done to satisfy my own need to demonstrate how I'm not racist on social media, it's not truly well-intentioned. If I show visible emotion and compassion, it's distracting to POC. It's definitely a sense that I'm guilty because of my skin colour and that I can do no right. The book would be significantly more useful if there were examples of beneficial actions which can be considered and undertaken, aside from just apologizing.

Aside from the obvious actions of doing something like speaking up when something obviously racially-unjust is occurring, and being open to feedback on my actions, words or behaviours, I don't have a strong sense of what I can do from here. I'll continue to keep reading on the topic, but I can't yet commit endless adoration of this book just yet.

33 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    4 out of 5 stars

Food for thought.

Amy Landon sounds like an AI. I found her very hard to listen to & had a hard time not drifting off because her voice is so monotonous. The content was very interesting though and made me realize as a white person that I need to change some my attitudes and perspectives where people of colour are concerned. It made me realize that as someone socialized as white, I really have no clue what it’s like to grow up in a racist society. I can do better and I’m grateful that this book showed me where some of my biases lie and that I can do better.

25 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars

Some very important points made. Do your own research.

Everyone has to decide where they fit in and how they can authentically do the work to help make our world a better place. Just my personal thought but read lots, observe lots, listen lots and do not let anyone speak for you or others, regardless of your ‘race’ or theirs.
I wish everyone blessings, justice and love.

16 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

What I needed to hear

Reading this was the first, conscious step for me in confronting my inherent racism and I’m so SO glad I started with this book.

I’m a white woman in my 20s. I’ve never considered myself a bigot, a racist, or anything of the sort. If/when I’ve been confronted for causing harm to someone for something I’ve said or done, I’ve been horrified and deeply embarrassed. So naturally, I went into this going: “I’m not a racist, I don’t acknowledge differences between people who are white, or coloured, so this will just be a good exercise on how to talk with other people about them being racist.” And then Rabin DiAngelo got me HARD with this paragraph, right in the introduction:

“I believe that white progressives cause the most daily damage to people of colour. I define a white progressive as a white person who thinks he or she is not racist, or is less racist, or in the choir, or already gets it. White progressives can be the most difficult for people of colour because, to the degree that we think we have arrived, we will put our energy into making sure that others see us as having arrived. None of our energy will go into what we need to be doing for the rest of our lives: engaging in ongoing self awareness, continuing education, relationship building, and actual anti-racist practice. White progressives do indeed uphold and perpetrate racism, but our defensiveness and certitude make it virtually impossible to explain to us how we do so.”

Wow.

Had I not read this book at the beginning of my self-education on the Black Lives Matter movement, racism, and black culture, I would have spent the whole time not having confronted my own racism, my own unavoidable, socialized state of assumption and classification against people “other” than me. I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to spend time, and continue to do so moving forward, questioning my own privilege and what that actually means.

What an eye opener of a book. Full of examples of how we perpetuate racism daily, how we exhaust our friends and loved ones and fellow humans of colour all the time with our professed goodness...how, in spending our energy yelling from mountaintops that we’re not racist, we scoop water into our own boat and call it allyship, love, anti-racism. But it’s just us trying desperately to save face and it doesn’t help people of colour, or us.

I’ll be re-reading this one for sure. And cannot recommend this more for my fellow white people. Do yourself, and the people around you, a favour and take the time to read this book.

12 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Validating

This book is the story of my life since I moved to North America 25 years ago. Before, I came, I was just a person. When I arrived, I became black. I have described these behaviors to my peers many times without realizing they were actually a thing. White rage, white solidarity, white fragility and White women’s tears... we live these things everyday. A huge thank you to Robin DiAngelo for writing this book. It matters to me that you are white and you chose to write this book. Maybe white people won’t change but at least I know that this race thing is real and not my imagination or “sensitivity” and that there are others who see it, understand it and make it their life’s work to fight against it. I encourage everyone to read this book!

11 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars

It's A Slog

There are some interesting points made. I particularly enjoyed the points made about affirmative action. However the vast majority of the book is painful to listen to due to how the author assumes every little thing is about race (maybe the neighbourhood is bad because it's black or maybe, and much more likely, the neighbourhood is bad because it has a statistically higher crime rate), how the author cherrypicks examples from crazy women to generalize the population and how she brushes aside any criticism by saying, "You're not black, so you wouldn't understand.". To be fair, sometimes there are legitimate concerns that African Americans may have, but other times there are not. In fact given how many times the author says that things simply 'feel uncomfortable' to African Americans I'd say a much better title for this book is 'Black Fragility'.

9 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

Great meaningful content

Only feedback is the narration was a bit robotic. Didn’t know it was an actual person at first.

8 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    5 out of 5 stars

we have to talk about it

really interesting book on racism and whiteness, it hit the point to make me think about my own attitude, even if I always thought of myself as not a racist person. I know it's more complicated then that. I loved the audio book because I can learn while I'm keeping my hands busy at something else, but I though the voice was a bit " mechanical ".

6 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars

Propagande ethnomasochiste haineuse

Le niveau d’endoctrinement nécessaire pour supporter ce livre est ahurissant. L’auteur part d’une prémices non fondée (elle le précise elle-même) et elle explique ensuite toute sa théorie pour ensuite argumenter son contraire. Le livre est dénué de cohésion et de suite logique et ressemble plus à un livre conspirationniste de propagande haineuse qui n’avance rien pour la lutte contre le racisme, car l’auteur n’ose pas présenter ses solutions (par craintes de poursuites judiciaires?). Je ne doute pas de l’intelligence de DiAngelo, elle est évidente, mais son nihilisme et son antihumanisme transpire tout au long du livre. Elle arrive parfois à présenter des analyses logiques, mais elle les contredit à chaque fois, ce qui rend son propos complètement inutile. Je recommande la lecture de ce livre pour la transparence de l’auteur, elle s’insère parfaitement et représente merveilleusement bien l’idéologie néo-marxiste intersectionnelle, et ce, d’une manière complètement décomplexée. Âme sensible s’abstenir, l’odeur de sang qui émane de se livre est comparable à celui du Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei ou de Mein Kampf, c’est le calme avant la tempête.

5 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

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  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Eric
  • 2020-03-10

Word salad

The only value this has is as a window into the mind of a certain kind of person. The author uses redefinitions of commonly understood language, personal anecdotes, and ideological jargon to lay out a pretty bizarre perspective on race.

The work is absolutely pseudointellectual and fails to cite authoritative studies or data in favor of Beyonce quotes. I’m not sure what type of person would find this author to be compelling. Dogmatically this is a complete trainwreck.

1 201 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2020-05-06

Repeditive and Derivative

Since the author gives presentations of race, hearing her talk about her insight and experience on this important topic seamed like it would add to her book but having heard her book, I see why they choose a very calm, professional reader.

The sample covers the the tone and depth of the book. She is a sociologist and knows all she need to about her audience whom she considers ignorant, uneducated, racist white supremacists members of the white collective or Klan. She's heard it all before so the only feedback she wants is thank you, She make an example of one participant who gives the wrong feedback. In another example she gives, another person is driven out of the room and coworkers think she may be having a heart attack. The writer is upset that this and the possible death will draw attention from what she is saying, Near the end she explains that she is un-white and sees nothing positive in white people.

Her actual material on racism is mostly other peoples work and opinion. The material seems to be used to show she went to colege, reads the right books and to expand this to book length rather that open people to talk about race.

Some people in her line of work, particularly those with her apparent attitude, may like and relate to this book and her experiences and frustrations in talking about race. Others,however, like her participant from Canada, may find this makes talking about race less likely.

She did have a piece of good advise that bares repeating. We should seek more to understand than to be understood and to console than be consoled. I had already gotten that advise from St Francis but its still good advise.

803 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Wedge Molthen
  • 2020-05-12

terrible book do not waste your time

read this book because the title sounded interesting was not interesting in the slightest the author goes on some pretty bull theories and basically gives you the opinion of not believing her with contradicting herself

678 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon customer
  • 2020-05-31

Americentric

The pamphlet is americentric to the point of parody. To the point of nationalistic bigotry.

610 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Jay
  • 2020-06-08

Smug, Manipulative and Void of Humanity

There are so many problems with this book that it would take me a few hours to document them. Maybe I will do that at some point.

In summary, the author redefines racism to include unconscious bias and concludes that any and all white people have these and are racists. If you object to the new definition or object to being called a racist under this new construct, then you suffer from a new invented condition called "White Fragility" and should be shamed repeatedly. Over and over and over.

Her approach is manipulative, smug and void of humanity. It ignores the complexity of human existence and human interaction and, in my opinion creates less healthy and authentic interactions and relationships.
Love and vulnerability beget change. Shame does not..

556 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Gary French
  • 2020-06-04

radical

I read it and was not impressed with psych 101 tactics to take away dissenting views. If we only have 1 side of any story we are being robbed of real progress.

375 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Strapazzata
  • 2018-10-16

Lacking

Lacking historical perspective and overwhelming biased by personal experiences which are not representative of the vast majority of non African Americans.

704 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Darren P. Auger
  • 2020-06-10

White guilt shoved down your throat

I've tried listening to this audiobook with an open mind. But all that basically says is all white people are racist, that all white people should have white guilt, and that white people should all kiss black or brown people's asses to make up for history. This book has a twisted and absurd perception of race relations and provides no solutions. Here's an idea: Get over history, and live every day treating every human being with respect.

341 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
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    1 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Tomer Nahumi
  • 2020-06-14

If you're white you are automatically racist

I was hoping to learn some new things and understand racism from a different perspective.

While I agree being black is not easy, the author blames everything on all white people and all white people are at fault for any failure in the black community.

If you are white, you are privileged and racist. If you are black, all your misfortunes are due to white supremacy and the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow.

The author doesn't offer any real solutions to fixing racism. They just criticize white people and want all white people to feel guilty for being white. If you don't like to talk about race that makes you racist. If you say you have black friends and say you don't see color that also makes you racist. If you live in a predominantly white neighborhood or go to a majority white school that makes you racist. If you don't have black friends you are racist. 100% of white people are somehow racist and should feel bad for their privilege. There is no solution besides to feel bad for being white.

On a personal note, I am white but my family immigrated to the US in the 90s with very little money. We did very well despite us having funny sounding names, no network and connections, and no assets. We just worked really hard and did things right. My siblings and I worked hard at school and today have careers. I am sure if we were black things may have been a bit harder but we never made excuses. And I will never feel guilty for being white for sins committed in the US decades and centuries before my family immigrated.

I get being black is hard. I don't think making all white people feel guilty is the solution.

337 les gens ont trouvé cela utile

  • Au global
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Histoire
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Jim
  • 2020-06-15

This Book Is A Joke

Want to be told how terrible your are? Then go for it. Want to listen in on thoughts and/or discussions that will add value to your life and the lives of those around you? Look elsewhere. The books success is dependent on your guilt and shame and helplessness.

318 les gens ont trouvé cela utile