Get a free audiobook

CDN$ 14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

Pulling together the myths, legends and stories handed down from generation to generation, all around the world, Graham Hancock presents his own, unique interpretation of history in this fascinating audiobook.

Fingerprints of the Gods is the revolutionary rewrite of history that has persuaded millions of listeners throughout the world to change their preconceptions about the history behind modern society.

An intellectual detective story, this unique history audiobook directs probing questions at orthodox history, presenting disturbing new evidence that historians have tried - but failed - to explain.

©1995 Graham Hancock (P)2016 Audible, Ltd

What listeners say about Fingerprints of the Gods

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    315
  • 4 Stars
    54
  • 3 Stars
    15
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    8
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    289
  • 4 Stars
    47
  • 3 Stars
    9
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    8
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    285
  • 4 Stars
    48
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    8

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Fascinating!

I first became aware of Graham Hancock thanks to his appearance on JRE. I had his voice and theories running through my mind for years until I stumbled across his book here and I knew I had to get it. I couldn't be happier that he decided to narrate this himself as his passion and dedication are palpable and he is able to transfer the emphasis on certain points as needed.

Anyone who is interested in the history of humanity and our place in the universe needs to listen to this and be reminded/understand that questioning the status quo is what we were born to do! The only question now is which book next?

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

spectacular

even if wrong (doubtful) a fantastic way to connect to our past and the planet

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

phenomenal read!

I love that Graham Hancock narrates it himself.
this book is part myth, part story, part expedition into antiquity

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Don't be afraid to question, to say, "What if?"

It is a worthwhile exercise to question your beliefs and periodically reexamine your preconceptions. This book shines a light on the limitations of our blind faith in academic perspectives and the limitations inherent within such a stance.
I really enjoyed it. Thank you.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

A total snooze

Graham means well but half the book is him trying to give technical evidence that should be in a youtube video rather than having to image it via many many many measurements mentioned. Graham also seems to only mention evidence fit for his narrative only.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Loved the original

This is an updated version of the book. I loved the original, and this updated version does a great job at updating the information. I can’t wait to listen to the next 2 books.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

very good

absolutely loved it. the author brings an engaging passion and gravitas to the subject matter.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A must read for all

Inspired and well delivered, this book is a must read for anyone interested in humanity's history. Academics are all too often detracting from real investigative archeology and Hancock's Fingerprints of the Gods is a well crafted push-back.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Fascinating exploration of an incredible idea

I was hooked in the first chapters but grew sceptical of the authors methods as the book goes on. Ultimately I was glad I stuck with it to the end. He does eventually lay out his full hypothesis. Only problem with the book is some of the numbers and math is hard to follow in audiobook form.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Coincidences Happen, But...

In this book, Graham Hancock frequently asks "Is this a coincidence?" or "Is that a coincidence?"

I have to answer "Yes. Sometimes yes, Graham..that sounds like coincidence."

But the extensively-compiled cicumstances in this book are cumulative - Hancock doesn't present evidence in isolation. Hmm..
To be clear, the author's conclusions are often quite a stretch: His belief that dates and locations for catastrophic events are predicted by precession calculations (how the Sun migrates through constellations over long stretches of time) are silly, in my opinion. His technical/mathematical arguments are often frankly boring. And his approach to discussing monument construction is straight-up pedantic.. but Hancock's unconventional posits are undeniably intriguing. Hancock populates this book (arguing for the existence of an advanced Ice-Age culture) with fascinating diverse examples - archeological and mythological/traditional - that prompt consideration. This book is a vast improvement on the works of other 'Revisionist Historians' like von Däniken or Sitchin - Hancock's posits are much more scientific and worthy of discussion. The writing is clear, loaded with vivid descriptions, and (for the most part) intellectually honest.

Graham Hancock is also an excellent reader - presenting his evidence and hypotheses with the confidence of a seasoned lecturer. In a business (audiobook reading) where author readers are often hit and miss, Hancock is spot-on. He delivers the text passionately. His pacing, cadence, and timbre are professional. His voice is exemplary for this kind of book. He could easily do a good job narrating the books of other authors.

I rate this controversial thesis a 5-star production. If you can apply an open mind,  prepare to have it blown.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Kelly
  • 2019-09-05

Classic in Historical Mysteries

I love all the Graham Hancock titles I've read/listened to so far, and having Graham narrate it is icing on the cake. He has a beautiful British accent and is a very good reader. First of all, to be clear for the skeptics, when Graham Hancock says "lost civilization," he usually means something more akin to a lost culture of advanced knowledge, which at one time or another informed many "lost civilizationS" such as the Egyptians and the Maya; he doesn't believe those two cultures directly influenced each other, just that they both inherited older traditions of myth and astronomy which had been spread around the world before written history began. This is Graham's hypotheses for why many cultures attribute their knowledge of writing, agriculture, and time keeping to a previous race of "gods" - they were probably referring to ancestors who had learned and passed on their great skills.
I'm glad I read "Magicians of the Gods" first, the sort of sequel to this one, because in the 20 years between 'Fingerprints' and its sequel, he's become a better writer. 'Fingerprints' has lengthy descriptions of travel episodes, which sometimes add character to the story (such as when he [illegally] climbed the Great Pyramid), but sometimes make the narrative slow to a crawl. 'Magicians' has the benefit of updated research on the possible events of the end of the last ice age, and older structures around the world which hadn't been discovered in 1995.
All that said, Fingerprints put forth many ideas and hypotheses which still haven't been debunked or explained, and which I never hear from mainstream history books. As just one example, Mercator (of map projection fame) published a map in 1538 which shows a continent identical to Antarctica, in exactly the right place. Antarctica wasn't supposed to have been "discovered" until the 1800s, but Mercator's map was probably based on older source maps now lost -- and Mercator wasn't the only one with such a map. Did the original maps come from the great astronomers and navigators of the Ottoman Empire? Were they passed on from the library at Alexandria? What wasn't mentioned in the book was that Mercator himself corresponded frequently with John Dee, the famous court astronomer of Elizabeth I, who took an interest in old Middle Eastern religious books and texts, many of which weren't translated into English. John Dee had the largest library in England and provided Mercator with materials. This could have been the perfect opportunity for Mercator to update his maps with what he saw as the best information available to him. Interesting stuff, and it's why Hancock's books are so popular. He doesn't need to over-dramatize his material, because there is plenty to choose from, and he presents it all in a rational, questioning way.
The classic controversies brought up in Fingerprints, and still hot topics today, are an Ice Age dating of the Sphinx, by Schwaller de Lubicz, John Anthony West and Robert Schoch, and the Orion Correlation theory of the Giza pyramids by Robert Bauval.
This is a great book if you like the types of historical mysteries that have become fodder for conspiracy theories, even though Graham himself isn't an Ancient Alien theorist, and often argues against them. If you want to understand why Graham is so eschewed by older, stodgier, academic circles, start here, but you'll want to move on to what Magicians of the Gods has to offer: extensive data on the Younger Dryas comet impact hypotheses, hidden pyramids in Indonesia, and an astonishing section on the advanced astronomical observations of the Sabians, a star-worshipping cult in Harran, Turkey.

31 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • TJ
  • 2019-06-05

EVERYTHING is connected, NOTHING is coincidence!

... At least when you're Graham Hancock. This book of his teeters between thought provoking lessons in world history and groan inducing revelations sold as fact. Enjoy with a grain of salt.

36 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • oakidoki@aol.com
  • 2019-10-30

Dragged

Very interesting book. Could have been a lot shorter. When he goes into numbers and scale of things the math gets mind boggling

16 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Juan Santos
  • 2016-09-28

Best Book Ever

Finally finished it.. I'm not very good at reading, I don't give myself time to do it but with the audiobook was very easy for me. Loved it. I would recommend to everyone who wants to open his/her mind to a different reality, different history. Understanding it will give you enough arguments to feel you finally understand the world and civilizations.

21 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Linda SB
  • 2016-10-27

Great book with excellent narration!

I loved every moment of this book! If you're interested in ancient civilizations you should listen to this book. Hancock presents fascinating theories supported by sound research and clear conclusions. He also does and excellent narrarion.

28 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Diana
  • 2016-07-26

Valuable coverage of ancient earth human history

Graham Hancock did a wonderful job narrating his 1995 book Fingerprint of the Gods. I started this series with book 2, Magicians of the Gods, 2015, and it is interesting to see how much fine tuning Graham Hancock did in the 20 year span between the two related books. And, they are two entirely different books, with Magicians of the Gods focusing on a very significant geological event and its effect on humans and human's knowledge of their own history. Fingerprints of the Gods is an excellent introduction and foundation into the research going beyond the public narrative of mainstream academia and what is taught in public schools. Humanity's history, and earth's history is far more interesting than what is taught.

This book was pretty serious in parts, and I had to divert to a couple of other books in the meantime before returning to complete it. I've mulled over what I have learned in this book, and see how it fit with the two David Wilcock books read in the meantime. There is so much connection between their work - both authors are "big picture" oriented. David Wilcock even refers to Graham Hancock's work within his books too.

The third book of this trilogy will be coming later this year (2016) and I am looking forward to reading (listening) to that.

55 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Meraj Muqueem
  • 2019-05-30

Overall i enjoyed it ... there is always buts and ifs...

The narrator presents all the values and questionable architecture but i think somewhere and somewhat fails to connect the the dots to complete the picture or might he possibly be coming close to it ...and i can feel the effort he made to compile the knowledge he painfully gathered ... really would like to hear more...

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Domingo
  • 2017-02-26

Good but verbose

An enthralling book, but Graham ventures too far into speculation. Nonetheless, the consolidation of so many verified scientific facts does well for the mind to conceive of new possibilities for the past and the future. At times the argument devolves into what fits Graham's theory and not what is most likely, or he will take inconclusive data and draw a conclusion based on his "intuition." Still, a worthwhile prequel to Magicians of the Gods.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • RF
  • 2019-12-05

Stick to facts

Very frustrating book that was filled with bizarre conjecture. He should have started with the conclusion and then developed possible links to the deep past of 8,000 years ago. I felt there was too much grasping at global synchronicity rather than facts. Similar stories can be due to shared experiences or shared stories - very different ..

Yes there were smart people 8,000 years ago and the likelihood of smart navigators 8,000 years ago makes sense and yes they can have come from several places and gone elsewhere..

As per other archeologists there were people in west Africa who had technologies as well (I like how this is never discussed and Antarcticans magically get to the Nile rather than landing in west Africa? There are settlements in the amazon that date to 6-8000 years ago), and before the lake toba eruption of 74,000 years there were millions of humans after just 10 thousand so there were plenty of years and people before the ice age who could have learned and shared.. anyhow.. let’s stick to the facts ..

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2019-05-30

Definitely Worth Reading

The beginning and end are phenomenal. the middle seemed a hit redundant. Overall, a great read and would recommend to anyone.

1 person found this helpful

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2019-05-24

Light is back!

This is all what I was looking for! Thank you Sir Hancock, this is a Masterpiece ! Piece by piece, everything make sens and we can feel the light on our shoulder warming back again our consciousness on our lost great History. Gathering all these valuable, priceless I should say, clues, from all over, and displaying the best overview I ever heard is just magic and vibrating to the point I feel deeply tuned and deeply thankful. I feel able to follow the tracks now with more confidence. Deep thanks for your time, effort and sens of responsibility. This is true work and skill. Thank you for sharing that. Thank you
Alban