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Good to Go

What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery
Written by: Christie Aschwanden
Narrated by: Allyson Ryan
Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (4 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

An eye-opening, myth-busting exploration of how the human body can best recover and adapt to sports and fitness training

In recent years "recovery" has become a sports and fitness buzzword. Anyone who works out or competes at any level is bombarded with the latest recovery products and services: from drinks and shakes to compression sleeves, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, and sleep trackers.

In Good to Go, acclaimed FiveThirtyEight science writer Christie Aschwanden takes listeners on an entertaining and enlightening tour through this strange world. She investigates whether drinking Gatorade or beer after training helps or hinders performance, she examines the latest trends among athletes - from NFL star Tom Brady's infrared pajamas to gymnast Simone Biles' pneumatic compression boots to swimmer Michael Phelps' "cupping" ritual - and she tests some of the most controversial methods herself, including cryochambers, floatation tanks, and infrared saunas.

At a time when the latest recovery products and services promise so much, Good to Go seeks answers to the fundamental question: Do any of them actually help the body recover and achieve peak performance?

©2019 Christie Aschwanden (P)2019 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

What members say

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Interesting

I found times I questioned the age of the science being used but in general some really good information.

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars
  • Nathan A Cummins
  • 2019-05-19

Good, not great

Dragged a bit in early chapters - I thought too much time spent debunking non scientific methods of new age recovery options. Took on too much of a negative tone vs focusing on how to recover properly. The last couple chapters were much better and improved my overall perception of the book

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Gregg Michael Thomas
  • 2019-07-09

A little bit of knowledge in a long listen

As others have stated, you can save yourself several hours of negative reviews of all recovery modalities and listen to the last chapter. Then go to sleep.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • M. Strong
  • 2019-07-01

This book isn't about what it claims to be about

The content of this book isn't one-star content, but the book is quite a bait and switch. The title and sub-title of the book give you the impression you are going to get a solid analysis of the recovery techniques athletes are using today and whether or not they work. Unfortunately, this book is about 15% about that. The book may have been more appropriately titled, "Random Anecdotes and Remembrances from the Annals of Sports Science and Pseudoscience." Then it would have been a three or four star book that I wouldn't have read. Instead, I got something I didn't want based on a misleading title.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Richard Valentine
  • 2019-05-22

Great book/ extremely important message

Great message and great book. Very informative and well worth the read/listen. definitely highly recommended!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Yinesis
  • 2019-11-22

One of the best fitness books I have read in the last 50 years !

A great overview and science based assessment of today’s known recovery tools used by athletes , a respectful debunking of myths like stretching, icing, no pain - no gain training approaches... also pointing out the role of placebo effects and a short dive into what we don’t know about the supplement industry. A must read for any athlete or person struggling with stress management, who wants to move towards a chemical free more mindful approach to recovery and life in general.
The stubborn cardio junky might not benefit from this book, you need to be ready for it ( ;

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  • Marty90
  • 2019-10-31

All subjective

Author fails to provide debunking evidence from research studies. She tries everything and didn’t see any improvements or benefits; perhaps because she doesn’t have a rigorous workout schedule throughout the week. She states that she “used to be” an athlete, but in order to feel the benefits of things like Cryotherapy, infrared sauna, compression therapy etc your body has to actually have the need to recover. Reviews from recovery methods should come from actual athlete-journalist not just journalists. Didn’t finish the book because it’s just full of skepticism and self-opinionated.

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  • Paul Solt
  • 2019-10-04

Great insights

I loved much of the book. It was good to get exposure to many different recovery methods, and to see how studies with small sample sizes can be engineered to create any outcome.

We need more rigorous studies to investigate recovery methods.

It left me wanting more. What’s next?

I feel it didn’t properly address plant based diets, but that’s probably because thats we’re I am, and the author is not.

Not over-hydrating and listening to my body were the biggest takeaways. Run your own race, be willing to stop early if your body doesn’t feel right. And spend more time recovering, even if it’s the placebo effect, use methods, believe they work and it will help.

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  • Soren G. Brockdorf
  • 2019-07-29

Great Start

Great overall book to read. You would need to go deeper, here are a few examples.
1) She discusses how we dont need salt on a marathon quoting Lore of Running, what she never mentions which is in Lore of Running, is that if you are one of the 10% who have 4-5 times the salt requirements of a normal runner, you could be in serious trouble without salt.
2) TSS, is a good measure for the bike, but not all sports like she says. TSS was only created for the bike, it is used for other sports, but not for it. Try a 800 TSS week on the bike and then on the run and tell me if it is the same.
3) She uses Ryan Hall as an example of over training, which is true that he often pushed too hard to early and was often flat for the season, but he clearly points out in his book that he constant desire for losing weight destroyed his career.

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  • Cyle Adair
  • 2019-04-10

Listen to your body

I don’t think this was worth the time to listen to. It basically debunked everything about nutrition, rest, exercise, etc. Just left me thinking there is no right answer for anything and kind of deflated. My workouts, eating, and motivation have all gone down personally because I keep thinking about what she said that really this stuff doesn’t matter.
If you like debunking things this book is great. But it hasn’t helped me and only made me more confused.
I am going to try to listen to my body more to see what happens.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful