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Good to Go

What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery
Written by: Christie Aschwanden
Narrated by: Allyson Ryan
Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
3.9 out of 5 stars (7 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

An eye-opening, myth-busting exploration of how the human body can best recover and adapt to sports and fitness training

In recent years "recovery" has become a sports and fitness buzzword. Anyone who works out or competes at any level is bombarded with the latest recovery products and services: from drinks and shakes to compression sleeves, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, and sleep trackers.

In Good to Go, acclaimed FiveThirtyEight science writer Christie Aschwanden takes listeners on an entertaining and enlightening tour through this strange world. She investigates whether drinking Gatorade or beer after training helps or hinders performance, she examines the latest trends among athletes - from NFL star Tom Brady's infrared pajamas to gymnast Simone Biles' pneumatic compression boots to swimmer Michael Phelps' "cupping" ritual - and she tests some of the most controversial methods herself, including cryochambers, floatation tanks, and infrared saunas.

At a time when the latest recovery products and services promise so much, Good to Go seeks answers to the fundamental question: Do any of them actually help the body recover and achieve peak performance?

©2019 Christie Aschwanden (P)2019 HighBridge, a division of Recorded Books

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  • Overall
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    4 out of 5 stars

Interesting

I found times I questioned the age of the science being used but in general some really good information.

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  • Gregg Michael Thomas
  • 2019-07-09

A little bit of knowledge in a long listen

As others have stated, you can save yourself several hours of negative reviews of all recovery modalities and listen to the last chapter. Then go to sleep.

4 people found this helpful

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  • M. Strong
  • 2019-07-01

This book isn't about what it claims to be about

The content of this book isn't one-star content, but the book is quite a bait and switch. The title and sub-title of the book give you the impression you are going to get a solid analysis of the recovery techniques athletes are using today and whether or not they work. Unfortunately, this book is about 15% about that. The book may have been more appropriately titled, "Random Anecdotes and Remembrances from the Annals of Sports Science and Pseudoscience." Then it would have been a three or four star book that I wouldn't have read. Instead, I got something I didn't want based on a misleading title.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Nathan A Cummins
  • 2019-05-19

Good, not great

Dragged a bit in early chapters - I thought too much time spent debunking non scientific methods of new age recovery options. Took on too much of a negative tone vs focusing on how to recover properly. The last couple chapters were much better and improved my overall perception of the book

3 people found this helpful

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  • Richard Valentine
  • 2019-05-22

Great book/ extremely important message

Great message and great book. Very informative and well worth the read/listen. definitely highly recommended!

2 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 2020-06-07

Keep it simple

We learn that the secret is that there is no secret. Rather the key to recovery is sleep and figuring out how to remain relaxed and comfortable as that will lead to metabolic efficiency.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-05-23

Well written, but has a arrogant negative bias

The book is written with a nice clear tone and is fun to listen to. I did get a lot of useful information from the book, but not what I was looking for (help on recovery). She approaches every modality with an arrogant negative bias and possibly more than 95% of the book is dedicated to debunking recovery modalities. The book can be summarised to "there is only two things that speed up recovery: sleep and placebo, nothing else work more than insignificant amount." She uses scientific studies to debunk the effect of almost all modalities, except floating tanks (maybe because she likes them her self). And to emphasize her points she uses anecdotal evidence and celebrity name dropping. For example, "it doesn't matter what you eat, because Usain Bolt ate chicken nuggets at the Olympic village." The goal of the book and the author seems to be to debunk recovery modalities, not to figure out how to speed up recovery. There is so much missing from this book. For example, the notion that sleep works as a recovery modality is just a notion, only a few sentences are mentioned about how to optimize sleep (the usual, eye mask, cold room, earplugs, etc). And other than that there isn't anything else about "how to improve recovery". it helped me to shrug off some fear of missing out because I don't have access to fancy recovery methods, like cryotherapy. But if you want to figure out how to recover better, this is not the book. My impression from the book is that there is pretty much nothing you can do to recover faster. It appears that recovery science has not cumulated to much of anything else that placebo modalities. I think I'll read another book to get a second opinion.

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  • Sara
  • 2019-12-20

Review of recovery science with just the right amount of skepticism

I appreciate the author’s excellent grasp of literature appraisal. Her clear eyed view of the questionable science of recovery was solidly informative.

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  • Yinesis
  • 2019-11-22

One of the best fitness books I have read in the last 50 years !

A great overview and science based assessment of today’s known recovery tools used by athletes , a respectful debunking of myths like stretching, icing, no pain - no gain training approaches... also pointing out the role of placebo effects and a short dive into what we don’t know about the supplement industry. A must read for any athlete or person struggling with stress management, who wants to move towards a chemical free more mindful approach to recovery and life in general. The stubborn cardio junky might not benefit from this book, you need to be ready for it ( ;

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  • Marty90
  • 2019-10-31

All subjective

Author fails to provide debunking evidence from research studies. She tries everything and didn’t see any improvements or benefits; perhaps because she doesn’t have a rigorous workout schedule throughout the week. She states that she “used to be” an athlete, but in order to feel the benefits of things like Cryotherapy, infrared sauna, compression therapy etc your body has to actually have the need to recover. Reviews from recovery methods should come from actual athlete-journalist not just journalists. Didn’t finish the book because it’s just full of skepticism and self-opinionated.

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  • Paul Solt
  • 2019-10-04

Great insights

I loved much of the book. It was good to get exposure to many different recovery methods, and to see how studies with small sample sizes can be engineered to create any outcome. We need more rigorous studies to investigate recovery methods. It left me wanting more. What’s next? I feel it didn’t properly address plant based diets, but that’s probably because thats we’re I am, and the author is not. Not over-hydrating and listening to my body were the biggest takeaways. Run your own race, be willing to stop early if your body doesn’t feel right. And spend more time recovering, even if it’s the placebo effect, use methods, believe they work and it will help.