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Publisher's Summary

The New York Times best seller, updated and expanded, featuring 15 explosive new chapters.

The previous edition of this now-classic book revealed the existence and subversive manipulations of "economic hit men". John Perkins wrote that economic hit men (EHM) "are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder". In Perkins' case, the tool was debt - convincing strategically important countries to borrow huge amounts of money for enormous "development" projects that served the very rich while driving the country deeper into poverty and debt. And once indebted, these countries could be controlled.

In this latest edition, Perkins provides revealing new details about how he and others did their work. But, more importantly, in an explosive new section, he describes how the EHM tools are being used around the world more widely than ever - even in the United States. The cancer has metastasized, yet most people still aren't aware of it.

Fear and debt drive the EHM system. We are hammered with messages that terrify us into believing that we must pay any price, assume any debt, to stop the enemies who, we are told, lurk at our doorsteps. The EHM system - employing false economics, bribes, surveillance, deception, debt, coups, assassinations, and unbridled military power - has become the dominant system of economics, government, and society today. It has created what Perkins calls a "death economy". But Perkins offers hope: He concludes with dozens of specific, concrete suggestions for actions all of us can take to wrest control of our world away from the economic hit men and help give birth to a life economy.

©2004 John Perkins (P)2016 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What listeners say about The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man

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Don't waste your credits.

Excellent story and initial descriptions, the last four chapters were needless and nullified the author's credibility. He could have left off the section of the text where he slips into emotional pleas about activism. I probably shouldn't expect anymore out of a bourgeois boomer attempting to repent for crimes against humanity, conveniently well after his financial position is well secured for life, reminiscent of Al Gore and his more convenient timing. Substantive on the surface, nullified by the presenter.

4 people found this helpful

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a must read for every free thinker!

have heard about this book before but was skeptic about some of the testimonies in the first version, this version answers alot of questions and creates even more, which is awesome!

1 person found this helpful

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Must read

Opens eyes, surfaces truth, points reality, educates minds all in one book. It will change your projection and perception of globalization.

1 person found this helpful

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Interesting Tell All

Although some of the statements by the author are questionable his stories are unite interesting. I wish he would have dug in deeper into the corruption and less about his opinions.

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what a horrible government the us is

I was amazed and sickened at the horrendous activities and atrocious acts of the United States , and the corporate world.

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Deep Insight Into the Political Totalitarian Hierarchy

I believe most people in there fifties realize that there is something amiss in the world. As a child in the late sixties and early seventies I and many of my classmates were try in our own little ways of helping to end poverty by bringing in food for food drives collecting money in those orange UNICEF boxes and we brought money from home to give our school to adopt financially several children in developing countries. My wife and I undertook to do the same when we were first married. At some point in time I realize that many of these organizations had high paid executive with an administrative budget of over 50% of each donations dollars. In addition there seamed to be little to no improvement to world poverty. The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man bring to light the true reality of world greed to exploit the impoverished for personal gains.

I deeply recommend this book in written or audio form. The audio is well spoken, very clear and easy to listen too.
Everyone needs to hear what John Perkins has to say. I would be homered to meet the man.

So get this book now! Time is of the essence!

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Voice performance is good, content inconsistent.

If you pick this book up, keep your critical thinking close.
The author seems to have a two set of rules he judges. By one he judges the US and its policies and by another the rest of the world.
He praises cultures of Panama, Colombia, Iran, Indonesia etc., but never directly praises one good thing about the culture that produced the comfort and luxuries he enjoys and sells to the rest of the world.
He praises his skills as economist, but fails to mention the complexity of logistics that required to supply a single gorrila fighter agist the will of the local authorities with the 100 rounds that fighter would need to inflict preassure on that local government/community. Or the time and energy needed to move that fighter accross boarder for training for those violent actions. Doesn't it suggest there is other player(s) involved that he never mentions? Wouldn't that time and energy be better spent by those farmers to find a more profitable location/income in presence of electricity and roadways?
With each episode he mentioned I was left with "What about X?" In the end it was painful to listen ...

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If you hate the USA youll love this book

I believe the premise of the story, that the US has " EHM " types that work for private businesses and get poorer countries saddled with mountains of debt for control. I just hate how this is portrayed in the book, and the multitude of obviously fake interactions that are trying to drive the point home but instead led me to further and further mistrust the authors validity. (ie the puppetmaster, the coversations in indonesia with the college students, the graffit in panama, the boys playing with stick guns) its incredible that the author met such politically savvy poor indonesians and panamaniand and they said such convenient things which furthered his narrative. This seems like a book dreamed up by a boring anti american college professor, not a true story of someones lived experience. The author rarely includes names, dates, locations or specific details of his work how he specifically did the work, what the people at the world bank or asian development fund asked him, what he said, etc. for example the author says he submitted his forecast on indonesias economic growth, a project the character spent at least 8 months on, thousands of hours, was purposelfully told to exaggerate statistics and falsify data. then simply says he was "grilled pretty hard for an afternoon by the economists at the world bank and asian development bank" and basically dismisses it, going on to speak about some inane topic like his search for the supposed NSA agent that trained him. You would think that if someone truly spent almost a year of their life making a false report, then being grilled on it it would warrant mote than two sentances and a little more detail. But this basically sums up my issue with the book. its way too heavy on anecdotal accounts that are likely either entirely or mostly fabricated and way too light on facts.

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Great book!

I would recommend to anyone looking for answers and doesn’t understand the financial system in which we live.

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very informative

for anyone interested in what's really going on in the world this is a great book.

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  • Bill Redfield
  • 2016-02-24

Don't buy the first "confessions. .." buy this one

A lot of repeat information for about the first half with some, not much more detail or clarity of the first book. So I wouldn't waste the money buying the first rendering. The remaining 15 or so chapters are packed full of new and some repeat information for clarity purposes because there is a lot going on.
Now about the content, it had and has me pissed off knowing all the misinformation that has been pushed to the general public while the greedy bastards are still continuing to conquer, destroy, kill, manipulate, ..... and no one is held accountable. The outsiders pay dearly on a continuous basis without the slightest smidgen of guilt or compassion. Pure evil is the best way to describe it.

98 people found this helpful

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  • Zikomo
  • 2017-06-17

Starts off interesting, but a lot of it is filler

The author pretends to take responsibility for his actions, but is really looking to do some virtue signalling. On the one hand, he admits that the bad stuff happened because guys like him (and worse guys) used lies, threats and even violence to force foreign leaders to make bad decisions. But he also wants us to believe that the economic problems in the world are the fault of free market capitalism. It's ridiculous. Free market capitalism is very much opposed to the practices that he describes in the book, and yet he wants to blame capitalism and sympathize with left wing terrorists.

15 people found this helpful

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  • theboot
  • 2017-05-07

Good message garbled in self-pity

This book could've been 25%, possibly 35% shorter if the author spent less time wading around in guilt and self-pity and spent more time on the details of the mini-stories and the overall message. A worthwhile read if you can block out the annoying interludes of guilt confessions.

11 people found this helpful

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  • alan
  • 2016-05-09

Time to Open our Eyes - and Say Enough!

After listening to The Creature from Jekyll Island and others, The New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man really is a eye opener and it fills in the gaps. This book is a must listen if you really want to understand what is going on in the global economy. If your concerned for the environment and why the World Bank says they want to eradicate global poverty but in fact are the agents who support global corporations to rape the 3rd world, then your ready to swallow the red pill and buy this book.

26 people found this helpful

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  • Luca
  • 2016-05-20

Read, read, read!!

This book is a must read, especially for any American who may be struggling to understand the world we live in today and what role the US plays in it.

36 people found this helpful

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  • jksc2011
  • 2016-05-08

Vivid accounts of historic hidden truth, it's a...

Sad Necessary Awakening to the Real State of the Union. This updated edition brings us right up to 2015 atrocities and sources of hope and action.

14 people found this helpful

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  • Perpetual
  • 2016-05-01

Confirmations of Fear

This book confirms much of what you fear goes on among massive multinational corporations and our governments. Much of the "aid" we send other countries through various financial mechanisms is a veiled attempt at strangling them with debt and dependences as those countries develop. Perkins does a great job sharing the behind the scenes activity and the reasons for it, painting a complete picture of the things we suspected were happening. Perhaps the only negative about this book is that some of the later chapters get washed out with generic suggestions to prevent this in the future albeit a very positive message. When even our political system is used against us, keeping us fighting unimportant battles with each other, it is hard to accept a simple message of buying goods from good companies and acting in good conscience after the level of moral disregard and wanton malevolence is made clear.

18 people found this helpful

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  • Jonathan Love
  • 2016-08-17

More like Liberal Hit Piece

A friend recommended this book to me and, although I know his political positions, he revealed a limited premise that really got me excited. What I found, however, was chapter after chapter of a mea culpa by a man who, while self-admittedly escaping his puritanical upbringing, claims to have known he was doing wrong, but did it anyway.

The story is actually fascinating, but rings hollow as not once during the book does he give any detail of being an economic hit man. In fact the book reads more like a loosely, tied-together, string of Wikipedia entries wherein he inserts himself into that history and then blames Capitalism for every death around the world that could plausibly be related to a western company's market entrance.

All that being said, there's plenty in this book that I do believe and admire Mr. Perkins for writing a generalized book of a highly slanted perspective of 'Corporatocracy'. At the end of the day, much of this stuff can't be denied, regardless of personal political persuasion. For me, it's really not so much the problems (although hyperbole doesn't help anyone) I disagree with, it's the solutions proposed (e.g., government sponsored via tax-payer dollars) which only continues the cycle of fraud and filling the coffers of other companies.

If only Mr. Perkins left out the political partisanship (although in two instances he does mention Democrat party officials as facilitators and benefactors of said Corporatocracy), provided some details of how his economic forecasts actually forced governments to accept these loans, some context to his accusations via similar countries that didn't accept the economic incentives and their parallel growth, and didn't just throw crap up to see what sticks (i.e., one of his last chapters he just starts citing random articles that he thinks may corroborate his work, but also says he didn't do any vetting of the articles themselves), I might have been more swayed to what he was peddling.

Apparently as an Economic Hit Man, Mr. Perkins was superb since he managed to stay and grow in that field, but I seriously doubt his claims of "recruitment by the NSA" led to anything more than a peripheral interest in him due to his association with the son of a foreign dignitary. Also, his writing and conclusions aren't the work of any seasoned intelligence officer as they are laced with conjecture, hyperbole, speculation, and partiality.

The narrator was superb and I was able to listen at 3x speed without any problem; audio was clear and crisp.

88 people found this helpful

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  • Nick Kean
  • 2017-04-13

Good start, pathetic last half

After enjoying the first half of the book I was thoroughly disappointed with the rest. If I wanted to hear about shamanic healing and tree hugging I'd have bought a different book. The author thinks he's James Bond but comes across as more of a Walter Mitty.

27 people found this helpful

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  • D. Fawkes
  • 2020-01-27

Bits of gold in utter garbage

I will start out with this.
John makes some solid points about modern economic system, and had some excellent insight into the US/Saudi Arabia link. If you start panning, you'll find some good bits. But around those good bits is solid trash. Like turned up to 3.5x and wishing for 4x levels of a mix of self-flagatation and explaining how its not really his fault, while also pushing his personal new-age philosophy.

I will also say the US is far from saintly on the international stage, but is no worse than anyone else (And better than most) when you compare the US's actions to what adversaries and contemporaries get up to. But you'll find no nuance here, only praise for dictators and mass murders simply because they were on the other side of table from the US.

The interesting bits about the real workings of international finance, and the way the media controls the information. But for example, when discussing Panama he leaves out key events, such as Norriega declaring war on the US and US citizens and service personnel being attacked and killed by Panamanian forces. There is plenty wrong with how Just Cause went down, but insufficient provocation is not one of them.
In the lead up to the first gulf war, John leaves out the massive loans Iraq took from its neighbors - which it invaded to try to cancel - focusing only on how its all the US' doing. (which again, is not to say that US' actions didn't play a role, but it was not the primary mover)

Intermixed with all of this, John invites readers (listeners?) to come join his cult in the rainforest.

So if you're looking to hear how everything the America does is wrong, and anyone - literally anyone - counter to that is 100% great with no bad side for 12 hours, this is the book for you. If you want some nuance and actual perspective on how international finance plays out, this isn't the book for you.

John has nothing good to say about the US. But for some reason or another hasn't tried to emigrate to Ecuador or any of the other countries he praises. I wonder why that is.

3 people found this helpful

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  • dogaman
  • 2020-05-24

truth is not hidden but just available

truth is not hidden but just available for those who want to really know.
No need to hide the truth, just make sure that mainstream medias won't talk too much about it. It will suffice to drown it into the abyss that normal people will never visit.
This book is not censored, it is not hidden, it is just not shown to you. You need to go find it and read it.