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Everything Is F*cked

A Book About Hope
Written by: Mark Manson
Narrated by: Mark Manson
Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (247 ratings)

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Publisher's Summary

From the author of the international mega-best-seller The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck comes a counterintuitive guide to the problems of hope.

We live in an interesting time. Materially, everything is the best it’s ever been - we are freer, healthier, and wealthier than any people in human history. Yet, somehow everything seems to be irreparably and horribly f*cked - the planet is warming, governments are failing, economies are collapsing, and everyone is perpetually offended on Twitter. At this moment in history, when we have access to technology, education, and communication our ancestors couldn’t even dream of, so many of us come back to an overriding feeling of hopelessness. 

What’s going on? If anyone can put a name to our current malaise and help fix it, it’s Mark Manson. In 2016, Manson published The Subtle Art of Not Giving A F*ck, a book that brilliantly gave shape to the ever-present, low-level hum of anxiety that permeates modern living. He showed us that technology had made it too easy to care about the wrong things, that our culture had convinced us that the world owed us something when it didn’t - and worst of all, that our modern and maddening urge to always find happiness only served to make us unhappier. Instead, the “subtle art” of that title turned out to be a bold challenge: to choose your struggle; to narrow and focus and find the pain you want to sustain. The result was a book that became an international phenomenon, selling millions of copies worldwide while becoming the number-one best seller in 13 different countries. 

Now, in Everthing Is F*cked, Manson turns his gaze from the inevitable flaws within each individual self to the endless calamities taking place in the world around us. Drawing from the pool of psychological research on these topics, as well as the timeless wisdom of philosophers such as Plato, Nietzsche, and Tom Waits, he dissects religion and politics and the uncomfortable ways they have come to resemble one another. He looks at our relationships with money, entertainment, and the internet, and how too much of a good thing can psychologically eat us alive. He openly defies our definitions of faith, happiness, freedom - and even of hope itself.

With his usual mix of erudition and where-the-f*ck-did-that-come-from humor, Manson takes us by the collar and challenges us to be more honest with ourselves and connected with the world in ways we probably haven’t considered before. It’s another counterintuitive romp through the pain in our hearts and the stress of our soul. One of the great modern writers has produced another book that will set the agenda for years to come. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2019 Mark Manson (P)2019 HarperCollins Publishers

What members say

Average Customer Ratings

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Meh

I feel like the book started off well and then somewhere halfway he kind of went off on a tangent and I didnt care for it. Im glad hes reqd Yuval Hararis 'Sapiens' but I felt offended when he basically rephrased what Yuval said to add on to his text. ill stick with Gary Bishop moving forward. The beginning was nice tho.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

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  • 101
  • 2019-05-31

Dismissive, Depressing & Lacking in Insight

As a huge fan of The Sublet Art of Not Giving a F*ck I was pretty disappointed with this book. It doesn’t feature any of the insightful information that the previous book was so rich in.

The book seams to lack cohesion, and uniformity of subject matter, and honestly at times it feels like the Author is just taking the p*ss, so to speak. His overall tone sucks, and it just made me want to slap him.

It sounds like this book was something of an existential crisis for the writer, where he behaves poorly, lashes out against anyone and everything he perceives to be ‘stupid’—which may as well be everything as far as Mark’s concerned.

I got virtually nothing of value out of this book, which is stunning considering how meaningful his previous work has been to me.

The whole book boils down to: politics bad, religion bad, pain good, and the robots are coming for us... It’s depressing, it’s reductionist, and it is a damn shame that this is what Mark thought was worth devoting his time to.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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I had high hopes for this book.

I found this book scattered, not cohesive, negative and mostly boring. It had a few interesting facts but I really didn't learn much and struggled to even finish the book. Quite dissatisfied.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Mark Manson does it again! Couldn not put it down.

Mark Manson does it again! Couldn not put it down and it kept me interested the entire time

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

His first book is better

Having read and listened to Mark's first book, I thought this one was less self helpy but more story telling. I do appreciate that this one was actually read by Mark though.

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    3 out of 5 stars

Not nearly as good as the first book

First I'll say that I loved his first book.

There are some interesting ideas in this book, however the thesis of the book gets lost. It seems this book is more about his opinions, and his tone ended up feeling more dismissive and judgmental. This really is a book about what Mark Manson's personal philosophical beliefs are.

The end of the book just randomly starts to talk about AI and his vision of what the future is which he never even mentioned in the earlier parts of the book. The conclusion was very unsatisfying and didn't tie any of the earlier ideas of the book together.

The overall thesis of the book ends up being, give up putting hope in all Religious, Ideological, Social systems. But then all he does is present his own Philosophical Ideal as what we should put our "Hope" in. His thesis ends up being a self-defeating argument.

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    3 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Second half amazing

The first half meandered a bit. Second half really picked up and reached the highs established by the first book. Personally I also like the reader of the first book more. With the exception of the German accent part, the reader of this book was a bit bland.

  • Overall
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So Interesting!

Really great - found all of it super interesting. Totally recommend checking this one out!

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really like this guy

I'm not much of a book guy. but this is my second by mark and now my favorite. love the last chapter.

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  • V
  • 2019-06-22

obvious millennial pandering.

Kind of a pointless read.
Just seems to have wrote a book to put an f word in the title because that's the trendy thing to do. I bought it so it worked. but proof you should judge a book by its cover... or title. it's melennial pandering.

Starts with an interesting story. And has some interesting topics between the monotonous ramblings. Expect to check out and check in. not too much research and the author's opinion is essentially the conclusion.

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  • MommaJ
  • 2019-05-31

Good content, bad delivery

The book is good. I simply cannot listen to Mark Manson’s narration. I was left longing for the narrator from his previous book. Just too monotone for my adhd brain to stick with it. I needed the engagement of an expressive voice. Couldn’t even make it halfway through.

25 of 30 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars
  • Kindle Customer
  • 2019-05-25

Title misleading

I loved "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck", so I was excited for this one, thinking the title was hysterical ironic. Sadley, I felt that much of the book was nothing more than a giant rant on everything with no actual solution to propose. Just more cliche rants about every class of human and the expected domination by robots.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

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  • Log Jammin
  • Basking Ridge, NJ USA
  • 2019-05-17

5 star Philosophical soft-porn for the masses.

Read and masterfully delivered by the author, Manson constructs an easily digestible accessible philosophical jaunt through clever interpretations of Nietzsche and Kant as well as the Stoics.

Manson's path begins with his scribbling - in tiny print - The Uncomfortable Truth (essentially, that no matter how much we distract ourselves, the human condition is meaningless) on coffee cups for unsuspecting chain store customers, leads through a step-by-step "As Seen On TV" tutorial to create your very own religion, inevitably brings the reader to a conclusion that it's not because everything is f#cked that we need hope rather it's hope that needs everything to be f#cked, then explains how Edward Bernays channeled this truth with his Uncle Sigmund's conclusions to manipulate and convince the masses of their #fakefreedom while creating what is now the modern advertising economy.

Manson finally suggests that, “Instead of looking for hope, try this. Don’t hope. Don’t despair, either. In fact, don’t deign to believe you know anything...Don’t hope for better, just be better. Be something better. Be more compassionate, more resilient, more humble, more disciplined...— be a better human.”

My Audible experience was as enjoyable as Manson's previous entry into the pantheon of anti self-help self-help books and i found myself LLOL'ing (legitimately LOL'ing) enough to consider this work, much like life, a dramedy.

20 of 25 people found this review helpful

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  • Kallee1987
  • 2019-05-20

Not as entertaining as the first

Not nearly as enjoyable as the first to listen to but was still worth the read. I guess being less entertaining is part of the point of the book in light of the topic of distraction.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Lindsay S. Nixon
  • 2019-05-16

a string of ranty blog posts w/ a few good points

This isn't a "book" in my opinion. It's more of a collection of essays and ranty "blog posts" with maybe 1 or 2 academic-ish articles for HuffPo.

There are some parts of the 'book' that were well researched, provided excellent points and I thought to myself "oh wow" and "I'm going to have to read this again!!!" (30%) the rest was odd and didn't belong, despite Manson's best efforts to make it all fit. I feel like I read a string of ranty blog posts...

The writing also oscillates between deplorable to somewhat academic.

There are times where it reads like a polished, academic book (about 20%) but more often it is ranty blogging with slang like "Cray cray" and vulgar examples that Manson seems to slip in for shock value (except it doesn't work).

Manson is also a terrible narrator. His voice is bleh, but more alarming: he can't properly read his own writing--he can't deliver his own jokes and punchlines (!) It comes out awkward and unnatural-- making his "cray cray" and other slang even more distracting/weird.

15 of 20 people found this review helpful

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  • Stephen Brown
  • 2019-05-23

Was ok

Not as good as his previous book. It was a little better then ok. Worth the read if you like the guy

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Mk90
  • 2019-05-16

Narrator is lacking.

I enjoyed Subtle Art alot due to pacing, this narrator lacks the charm and character.

14 of 19 people found this review helpful

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  • Josh Hamel
  • 2019-05-14

A sequel with more meaning than it's big brother

Mark Manson hits the desperate desire in our current generation for hope and purpose. He grasps the current need for books that tell a story of hope in our society of what bleeds leads our news feeds.

This book preaches independence in a world where mob mentality and political correctness overshadow thought and reason.

Manson's dare to hope is an ode Martin Luter King Jr's I have a dream speech, but for the 21st century. "I hope that people are never treated as means but only as ends.....We imagined our own importance, we invented our purpose, we were and still are nothing, all along we were nothing, and maybe then, only then, will the eternal cycle of hope and destruction come to an end or:"

13 of 18 people found this review helpful

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  • Stephanie Peterson
  • 2019-06-14

Masterful writing, but stick to writing

The content and narrative of this book is fantastic! Just like it’s predecessor..... However, after listening to the Subtle Art, it just didn’t hold up from a performance standpoint. My only wish is that Mark Manson had chosen to let the same person narrate this version for him again, instead of doing it himself.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Dan Treuter
  • Madison, WI
  • 2019-06-01

Meh

Not as good as his previous book, but some interesting insights borrowed from Nietzsche and Kant.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • bengebara k.
  • 2019-05-23

Read this if you're confused

First, I want to say that I am a big fan/consumer of Mark's content; it helped me understand so many things about life, how to behave, how to react, etc. I consider his blog articles + 2 previous books like an experienced big brother talking to me about all the touchy subjects you can't talk about with your parents or that your parents never talked to you about. (Yes I'm still a college student, trying to figure things out).

This book honestly holds enormous value and touches on so many subjects from basic philosophy to marketing to psychology. It's kind of a quick "throwback" to human history and at the same time a hypothetical projection into the future of our human race. However:

1. I already mentioned that I'm a college student, a 23 years old looking for useful info, advice, help, hope... Mark was my go-to for this kind of info, and he never deceived, except this time! If you're looking for help or guidance for your life, I don't think you'll find it here; you might even feel a lot worse after reading this book. For more practical advice on how to perform better in your life, I recommend: "The subtle art of not giving a fuck" by the same author, you'll find all the help you need there.

2. I know that Mark intended to be misguiding in the book's title, but what for? I mean except the tiny part at the very end where he speaks about "hope" and how we should be better humans without it, the book is overall kind of dark. It claims to combat nihilism but, if you think about it, and you will, it somehow promotes it.

My advice here, for young and inexperienced people like me reading this, would be: Chill my friend, life doesn't need to be this complicated, and it certainly isn't except when you want it to be. You can be a better person, a better human being without processing all this info about the universe and history and Socrates and Plato and the f*****g never-ending longlist of things this book is trying to talk about (sorry Mark).

3. YES, we should always seek to get out of our comfort zones, go out there, and challenge our beliefs, test them, upgrade and improve them. Why not insist more on that instead of telling people to expect machines to become our gods and data our spirituality... Instead of disqualifying everything our human race has built its history upon (like Nietzche did, and btw lost his mind by the end of his life) let's work with what we already have, let's work on what we already are, and HOPEfully, become better without losing our minds or souls in the process. Again, for young and inexperienced people like me, my advice is: If you believe in something, don't give up on it, it's part of who you are! If you feel that being a Muslim/Christian/whatever makes you a better human being, the kind of human being you aspire to be, don't ever give up on that! If you feel that converting into something else is what will make you a better person, do that! And remember: you know nothing, Jon Snow! (A.K.A. Mark Manson, Kant, Nietzche, Freud, Bernays, etc.) They're all just trying to understand this weird world a little bit more, and so do you.

Side note: Emmanuel Kant also argues that raising questions about the legitimacy of the state, its law or its intellectual basis is tantamount to sedition, and could be punished by death – even if there was no violence or incitement to violence or rebellion. Sorry Mark, but if this book came out under Kant's ruling, you'd be dead by now, we don't want that, we need you!

Overall, I would advise this book for people who (relatively) think they have everything figured out and want a little uncertainty to grow. I would also recommend this book for people who believe our systems are perfect or infallible: Reading this will give you more perspective, it will question your beliefs, it will filter your convictions, It will either make you want to be sucked into a black hole and forget you ever existed, OR, make you realize you're already there and help you get out!

You've been warned!