Get a free audiobook

Factfulness

Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World - and Why Things Are Better Than You Think
Narrated by: Richard Harries
Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
4.7 out of 5 stars (334 ratings)

CDN$ 14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

For fans of Freakonomics and Thinking, Fast and Slow, here is a book by Hans Rosling, the scientist called "a true inspiration" by Bill Gates, that teaches us how to see the world as it truly is. 

Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of carrying only opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. When asked simple questions about global trends - what percentage of the world's population live in poverty; why the world's population is increasing; how many girls finish school - we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess teachers, journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers. 

In Factfulness, professor of international health and global TED phenomenon Hans Rosling, together with his two longtime collaborators, Anna and Ola, offers a radical new explanation of why this happens. They reveal the ten instincts that distort our perspective - from our tendency to divide the world into two camps (usually some version of us and them) to the way we consume media (where fear rules) to how we perceive progress (believing that most things are getting worse). Our problem is that we don't know what we don't know, and even our guesses are informed by unconscious and predictable biases. 

It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn't mean there aren't real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most. Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future.

©2018 Hans Rosling (P)2018 Recorded Books

What listeners say about Factfulness

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    256
  • 4 Stars
    67
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    0
Performance
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    205
  • 4 Stars
    72
  • 3 Stars
    10
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    2
Story
  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    233
  • 4 Stars
    51
  • 3 Stars
    7
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    3

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Helping you clear your head of the NOISE.

All day, every day we are bombarded with misinformation that skews our perceptions. This book is a fact check not just of the state of the world but also of the state of our ability to understand critically how we view it . A must for the thinker.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I thought it was boring at first

though i thought i was very boring at first with his monotone voice, it got more and more interesting. There were many moments when I felt so touched by his story of the villages, his mistakes and how he's learned a life lesson. Hans was truly a great man.

2 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

I wish everyone could read this book

I loved it. It really opened my eyes and made me question so many of my biases and how I describe things. Game changer.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Required Reading!

Absolutely loved this book! So much important information to navigate the world! Hans shares with us so much meaningful data. It can not be understated.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

My number one recommendation this summer

What a fantastic book. I have always enjoyed Hans Rosling and the work he has done. This book is thought-provoking and insightful. I listened to it and immediately listened to it again. It really helps put things in perspective. #Audible1

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Easily one of the best books I've read

This is one of those books that you finish reading, and immediately think the world could be drastically improved (even from it's continuously improving state) if it were added to every highschool, University and corporate learning programs.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Great human understanding!

It was great to listen, its incredible the many times when, the author openly shared about his mistakes. I love this from Him, because it helps me to learn from his leadership model. I will stand on His ground and yet he will recognize that he need it to keep learning from others. I love the book.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Everybody should read this book

My favorite book of all time, insightful and inspiring. What an amazing end to his wonderful journey!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Everyone Needs To Read This Book

This is the kind of book that you wish everyone in the world was forced to read. His surveys continually demonstrate that no matter how "smart" you are, most of us have an incorrect view of the world that is unfortunately more negative than it needs to be. Having said that, the clarity of the global situation made me more focused on what needs to be done to help solve problems in the world that most definitely do exist through a factfullness lense.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Interesting information presented blandly

The gist of the book is that what we think of as our knowledge of the world is wrong, or at least dated, and always takes the most negative option. It explains why this is so and tries to give data to help overcome the misconceptions. It is things like on average throughout the world men spend 10 years on education, what is it for woman 2 years, 5 years, 9 years. The answer is 9 years but most people pick two. Mostly because that the media presents worst cases. It is the same with rich countries vs. poor, which in itself is a misconception. Or that South Korea has both a longer life expectancy and a lower infant mortality rate than the U.S. It doesn't say everything's rosie, and it does present a framework for evaluating the data. The presenters voice sounds like an infomercial. Some points after they are made are beat to death. Overall it is worth a listen if for no other reason than to update your world view, but it is dry going.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • carlos gomez
  • 2018-06-01

Great Read not for Listening

The book shows supporting and supplemental graphs and images that are lost in thought when trying to listen through this book. I would prefer to read this book and validate the graphs/scenarios at play.

104 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • A. Yoshida
  • 2018-11-29

Develop a fact-based world view

This book is about developing a fact-based world view. Most people think the world is in the same state as they remembered it decades ago -- Africa is filled with people in extreme poverty, population is increasing exponentially, and most women in the world don't receive an education. In fact, most of the population is in the middle and birth rate has decreased dramatically in many countries. Ten reasons why we get it wrong: 1. Gap (categorizing by extremes, such as rich and poor) 2. Negativity 3. Straight Line (think a line on a chart will continue into the future at that same angle) 4. Fear 5. Size (misjudging the size of things due to lack of reference) 6. Generalization 7. Destiny (think people don't change) 8. Single (a problem has a single cause) 9. Blame 10. Urgency (jump to action without knowing all the facts)

38 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Tintin
  • 2018-04-08

Really simple, Really Slow

I only listened to 3 chapters but I have to say I've never set the speed at 3x before without missing anything.. I love Hans Rosling, but the interactive charts do so much better than this. The narrator is so slow, it's like he reads ellipses between every sentence. ... It's interspersed with irrelevant memories and anecdotes, a lot of repetition, and casual comment. Even some questionable advice on statistics: 10% differences are usually real, less than that, usually not. For something serious on trends try Steve Pinker's Enlightenment Now, and on errors in judgment Dan Kahneman's Thinking Fast and Slow. I love Rosling's Gapminder. Great delivery in person; this was disappointing.

93 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 2018-05-15

Really good, not flawless,

But what should anyone expect of anything? I found it uplifting and inspiring in contrast to what I generally hear reading the news. The primary take-away for me is that-regardless of the constant 'world is going to hell in a handbasket' drum-beat coming from news sources, politicians and other salespeople who benefit from panicked and thoughtless decision making- the world is in fact improving dramatically for almost everybody. Toward the end of the book, the author admits to hasty decisions that he was part of that cost lives. Wow. Very tough stuff to own and share. I think the author is a good guy, maybe cheering a bit too much for America to get knocked off the top of the heap for my tastes, but what do you want? He's Swedish.

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • markofu
  • 2018-09-09

Myth-busting and eye-opening, fact-based book

Myth-busting and eye-opening book, based on what’s actually “fact”, that corrects the many incorrect beliefs that we have of the world. The book is eminently accessible, despite being focused on facts :) I flew through it as I wanted to learn more about where I’d previously gone wrong. Focusing on facts, the author challenges us to also focus on facts so we can correctly understand the world as opposed to what’s presented in the media or worse, social media. The biggest take-away for me from the book is Rosling splitting the world into 4 levels, as opposed to our previous definitions of “developed” and “developing”. Additionally, despite the sensationalism of our media, the world is getting better.....it’s just that many of these changes are small, but overtime this gradual change results in a huge change. Great read and very educational.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • mia tavonatti
  • 2019-01-19

Eye Opening!

This book shoukd be required reading, especially during this time when we have so many people entrenching themselves in their "truth". I learned a lot and my perception of reality shifted and I am humbled...

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Dan Gottesman
  • 2018-12-07

A must listen/read for all who value truth

Enjoyable and enlightening listen or read bringing into focus realities and misconceptions of our world that I and most of us have carried most of pour lives. Hans shows us how our view world we live in, is in many cases outdated, or just plain wrong, yet we behave in our decision-making and relationships based on our often wrong understanding of reality. For those of us who value truth, and basing decisions on truth, the learning available to us from Factfullness is immeasurably valuable. A powerful case is laid out for a new approach to how we learn and draw conclusions about our surroundings and the rest of the world on all levels. In fact applying the teachings could even change the way we think about ourselves.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Williamb
  • 2018-05-26

Read this twice!

While Richard Harries' narration is a bit slow, this is a well read delivery. (Listen at 1.5.) The balance of anecdote and facts is very nicely balanced. Anecdotal illustrations are personal and meaningful. I have retold many of Hans Rosling's stories many times to illustrate the misunderstanding he was addressing most of his life. His reflective style that confesses his own erroneous outlook is a great way to build empathy. Rosling offers excellent advice about being suspicious of numbers without comparisons. Ratios are strong comparisons. Two valuable takeaways: there is no "them" and "us", and question your own cultural assumptions. Read or listen to this book twice - you will be wiser for it.

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Being
  • 2018-04-28

I really, really wanted to like this book.

Best book Bill Gates ever read. Okay. Best book I ever read? I'll never know because I found it excruciating to listen to. The author spent so much time patting himself on his back for his brilliance that his message got lost in the self adulation.

And the narrator...please, dude. This isn't an audition for a melodrama. It's a book. Just read the freaking book and leave out the acting, would you?

Returning it. Just cannot believe that I wouldn't get more out of a 20 minute Ted talk than I would trying to slog through this nightmare.

60 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robert Caldwell
  • 2019-01-22

Wonderful Story of the Facts of the World

I highly enjoyed this look at the world using data intermixed with the stories of a world health doctor who's been all over the world treating all kinds of patients. Excellent book.

3 people found this helpful