Get a free audiobook

CDN$ 14.95/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime.

Publisher's Summary

A renowned psychiatrist reveals how trauma affects children - and outlines the path to recovery.

"Fascinating and upbeat.... Dr. Perry is both a world-class creative scientist and a compassionate therapist." (Mary Pipher, PhD, author of Reviving Ophelia)

How does trauma affect a child's mind - and how can that mind recover? In the classic The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog, Dr. Perry explains what happens to the brains of children exposed to extreme stress and shares their lessons of courage, humanity, and hope. Only when we understand the science of the mind and the power of love and nurturing can we hope to heal the spirit of even the most wounded child.

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio. 

©2006, 2017 Bruce Perry and Maia Szalavitz (P)2018 Hachette Audio

What the critics say

"Filled with compassionate, caring stories by a wise healer and scientist, this book will appeal to all who are interested in understanding how children heal." (Lynn Ponton, MD, author of The Romance of Risk)

"In this harrowing but profoundly humane book, Perry and Szalavitz provide an all too timely, utterly engrossing account of traumatized children's lives.... Once I opened it, I could not put it down." (Sarah Blaffer Hrdy, author of Mother Nature: Maternal Instincts and How They Shape the Human Species)

"In beautifully written, fascinating accounts of experience working with emotionally stunted and traumatized children, child psychiatrist Perry educates readers about how early-life stress and violence affects the developing brain. He offers simple yet vivid illustrations of the stress response and the brain's mechanisms with facts and images that crystallize in the mind without being too detailed and confusing." (Publishers Weekly)

What listeners say about The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog

Average Customer Ratings
Overall
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    58
  • 4 Stars
    8
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Performance
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    47
  • 4 Stars
    6
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    1
Story
  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    53
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Didn’t know what to expect

I could not stop listening to this book. As a mother and one day a grandmother, I hope to use the knowledge that Bruce Perry , and Maia Szalavitz have discussed in this book . To remind us that the child is so precious and that trauma has so much effect on the child’s brain . I will listen to this book many times I’m sure . Thank you

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Love it!

I learned so much. The audio was great as well! I would recommend this audio book to anyone who works with children.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

A life changing book

Its a great life - saving and life-changing book. I have started treating my children with with more consideration after reading it. It is a equally valuable for a professional as well as a layman.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Insightful and compelling

Dr. Perry's experience with traumatized children comes to life in this text. He is able to explain what we know about trauma and brain development in ways accessible to the layperson and yet insightful to the student or professional. The book is well written and lays a foundation for future studies into this intriguing area of human growth and healing.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Loved this book

I had heard about this book from a family member of mine who read it as part of a course he was taking in university. Being a student myself in a different but similar field, i chose to download and listen to this book while i commuted. I really enjoyed the book and can understand why it’s used for educational purposes.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

makes you think.

it made me look back and reasses difficult interactions and difficult personality types i've had with people. good read, interesting perspectives.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • C. Turner
  • 2019-06-07

Nice to see some good come to those abused/neglect

I enjoyed this book as a graduate student in clinical mental health. I like to use the same approach and it's nice to see that others do too and found good results. It also reminded me that with trauma victims it's best to allow them a choice in their recovery. I do warn those with past abuse that this book contains some triggers and to be cognizant of them when reading this book as it contains some details on sexual abuse/assault and neglect. The descriptions are necessary in order to understand the treatment process.

15 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Robin Schrader
  • 2018-12-22

Helped me with my most difficult students.

This book IS the answer to what the students with the hardest behaviors need. This and Help for Billy

12 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • cindy w.
  • 2019-09-29

Every school counselor should read

This book was amazing. As a school counselor, we are seeing more and more children come into the school system with trauma and we are trying to teach them the academics required in schools but can't move past the behaviors they are displaying. Teachers are not equipped to help them with the trauma and are only being pushed by the administration to have these students show progress in their testing scores. I know that our school system will be looking into trauma-informed training, and I for one can not wait for that day. I am going to approach the administration to look at the NME and hope they consider this approach to help us help our students.

9 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • S. Rio
  • 2020-10-01

Required reading for ALL in Family Services & Child Education

Dr. Perry’s model for understanding and healing trauma in children NEEDS to be implemented world wide! As a parent of children that were adopted through the Foster Care System. This book has been eye opening on so many levels! It’s has explained so much about their trauma. As well as the whys and reasons they behave and react they way they do. Needless to say I was parenting them like they were non-traumatized children, which made some things worse. Just as Dr. Perry said! I have stopped immediately and have seen a big change in their behavior. I have been recommending this book to any and all therapist I know. Thank you Dr. Perry!

6 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • jdun93
  • 2020-09-23

excellent and informative

I am a psychotherapist working with children in the foster system and found this book to be very helpful in my work. I have also worked with adults and find that much of this can be applied to work with them, as well. I highly recommend this book to anyone working with children or adolescents in any capacity, either providing therapy, medical services, teaching, tutoring, or any other role. I also highly recommend this book for all psychotherapists regardless of the population you work with.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Megan E
  • 2020-07-27

Fantastic resource

This should be required reading for anyone who works with children, especially those from hard places such as foster parents, CPS workers and teachers.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Crystal Dutton
  • 2019-07-09

The book was not what I thought I was going to be

The book was a bit drawn out. It did not catch my attention at all. I am big into mental health and learning about it especially in children so I thought that’s what intrigue me a little. Narrator is good and have some good points it’s just not what I thought it was going to be. Hello disappointed I use my credit I’m at the café

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Keshia
  • 2018-12-01

follow up

Great study, lots of insight and a good resource. I will be sharing as well . persuing training.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 2020-10-07

Amazing book

I was truly impressed by the book and how it described non obvious but important things can be missed in children development. It’s helpful even with adults to understand what’s behind their actions. Strongly recommend this book!

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Sarah
  • 2020-08-14

A good introduction to trauma theory

I found this book a bit painful to read, and I wondered at the necessity of sharing so intensely the stories of child abuse. It felt a tad voyeuristic. I feel like we can understand trauma theory without needing to delve into children's private pasts. While their identities are HIPPA compliant and not disclosed, it still just doesn't feel respectful how much explicit detail the author goes into. It also feels like Dr. Perry doesn't acknowledge the work clients do in their own healing and takes a lot of credit for their progress/feels a bit like white saviorism. We never hear the stories of when Dr. Perry makes mistakes with his clients; just the stories where he is the only one in the room who can help the child. I'd also like to see it be more strengths-based; it felt focused on deficits and adversity each child has survived.

1 person found this helpful